OnCurating @ Motto Berlin. 23.07.2016

Posted in events, magazines, Motto Berlin event on July 15th, 2016
Tags: , ,

OnCurating Issue 31_Dorothee Richter_Motto books_1

On Curating @ Motto Berlin. July 23rd from 7pm

OnCurating #31- Spheres of Estrangement: Art, Politics and Curating

With contributions from

Josephine Baker-Heaslip, Jonas Becker, Franco ‘Bifo’ Beradi, Benjamin T. Busch, Dan Bustillo, Lilian Cameron, Joey Cannizzaro, Carson Chan, Jeni Fulton, Ken Gonzales-Day, Matthew Hanson, Anke Hennig, Alistair Hudson, Alison Hugill, Suzana Milevska, Jared Pappas Kelley, Penny Rafferty, PUNK IS DADA, Claire Ruud, Jack Schneider, Adrian Shaw, Paul Stewart, Sam Thorne.
Editors: Jonas Becker, Benjamin T. Busch, Matthew Hanson, Penny Rafferty, Paul Stewart

Today’s estrangement is a fully incorporated component of the modern experience, a stimulant for ‘surplus alienation’. Therefore, this issue asks what artistic, architectural and curatorial approaches to estrangement offer current discourse in organisation, aesthetics and activism. The articles unpack estrangement for the political, social and cultural sprint of our time.

Publisher: Dorothee Richter
Co-Publisher: Michael BirchallRonald Kolb
Editors: Jonas Becker, Benjamin T. Busch, Matthew Hanson, Penny Rafferty, Paul Stewart
Proofreading: Stephanie Carwin
Graphic Design: Ronald Kolb, Biotop 3000

 

Buy the magazine

Mould Map 4 – Eurozone Spezial. Hugh Frost & Leon Sadler. Landfill Editions.

Posted in Artist magazine, graphic design, magazines on July 8th, 2016
Tags: , , ,

Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_1Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_4Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_5Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_7Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_8Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_9Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_10Mould Map 4_Eurozone Spezial_Land Filled Editions_2045-6778-4_Motto books_2016_11

A book about Europe and its possible futures.
Featuring newly commissioned comics, art and graphics from; Leon Sadler, Edwin Burdis, Daniel Swan, Michael Willis, Patrick Crotty, Grace Wilson, Dan Mitchell, Will Sweeney, Ed Fornieles, Brecht Vandenbroucke, Yannick Val Gesto with Eva Munz, Sany, Amalia Ulman, Hanna K, MOSA, Gwenaël Rattke, Stathis Tsemberlidis, Yuri Pattison, Suzanne Treister, Jody Barton, New Scenario, Stefan Sadler, Jonathan Djob Nkondo, Gabriel Corbera, Pierre Vanni, Roope Eronen and Viktor Hachmang.

Contextualised by features on both near-future speculative / design fiction and historical counterculture movements including; Huw Wahl on 60s inflatable art collective Action Space, Federico Pagello on Frigidaire Magazine and comics of the radical left in 70s Italy, a selection of activist ephemera from the stock of Mayfair dealer Carl Williams at Maggs Brothers, Ingo Niermann in conversation with Matilda Tjäder about the origins and development of the Sternberg Solutions series, Dunne & Raby and the use of illustration within their United Micro Kingdoms project and finally a selection of works from the 2014 White Cube exhibition by Gilbert & George — Scapegoating Pictures For London.

Edited by Hugh Frost & Leon Sadler. Graphic design by Hugh Frost.

18.00€

Buy it

Mousse 54. Edoardo Bonaspetti (Ed.). Mousse Magazine.

Posted in 2016, distribution, magazines on June 28th, 2016
Tags:

Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_1Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_2Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_3Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_4Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_5Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_6Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_7Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_8Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_9Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_10Mousse54_Mousse Magazine_Motto Books_2016_11

IEVA MISEVIČIŪTĖ
Character Studies of Primeval Life Form
by Jacquelyn Ross

EXTEND, EXCEED, ENHANCE: PROSTHETICS AND SCULPTURE
by Lisa Le Feuvre

ANNE IMHOF
Choreographed layers
by Hans Ulrich Obrist

RAYMOND BOISJOLY, TANYA LUKIN LINKLATER, WALTER SCOTT
Native North America
by Andrew Berardini, Richard William Hill and Candice Hopkins

INSIDE TO OUTSIDE TO INSIDE
by Jens Hoffmann

NEW SCENARIO
Curating Holes
by Melanie Bühler

ROLE PLAY
by Maurizio Cattelan, Liam Gillick, Thomas Demand, Barbara Bloom, Christian Jankowski, Elmgreen&Dragset, Michelle Grabner, Tobias Rehberger, Ugo Rondinone, Harrell Fletcher, John Miller, Paulina Olowska

RONALD JONES
What You See Is What You See
by Krist Gruijthuijsen

GARY INDIANA
I Can Give You Anything But Love
by Andrew Durbin

WILLA NASATIR
Psychic Junkyards
by Lauren Cornell

RAGNA BLEY
An Idiosyncratic Abecedary
by Filipa Ramos

NOAH BARKER
Projecting an Island from Another
by Mark Beasley

ISIAH MEDINA
The impossible is the only (no-)thing that ever happens
by Pia Bolognesi

ME
by Dieter Roelstraete

SHIFTING BACKGROUNDS
by Anselm Franke

NOBODY IS SLEEPING IN THE SKY
by Geoffrey Farmer and Dora García

NOW, I AM AFRAID…
by Chus Martínez

CECILIA BENGOLEA AND FRANÇOIS CHAIGNAUD
Emotional Aesthetics
by Kathy Noble

MORAG KEIL AND GEORGIE NETTELL
Domestic Battlegrounds
by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen

AN ESSAY ON DRESS-UP AND OTHER THINGS
by Sabrina Tarasoff

 

€10.00

Buy it

Tunica Magazine #5. Jose C. Garcia (ed.). Tunica Studio.

Posted in design, distribution, magazines on June 23rd, 2016
Tags: ,

Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_1 COVERTunica 5_Motto books_2016_2Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_3Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_4Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_5Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_6Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_7Tunica 5_Motto books_2016_9

 

TUNICA presents an art of Individuals. We stand for the reality of the present.
Absolute: The new egos and the melodrama of modernity is the Exploitation of vulgarity, the Improvement of life…
TUNICA is created for this timeless fundamental Artist that exists in everybody.
Unconditional: Popular art does not mean the art of the poor people.
TUNICA is a cape of good hope.
Trust: We need the unconsciousness of humanity. Their animalistic stupidity and dreams, futurism, magic and life!
Staying power! Brave Comrades!
Long live TUNICA!

Contributors:

James Orlando
Sita Abellan
Louisa Gagliardi
Takanori Okuwaki
Roberto Piqueras
Eme Rock
Yung Beef aka Fernandito Kit Kat
Eyedress
Prefuse 73
Ilja Karilampi
Terranova
Wickerham & Lomax
Alexa Karolinski
Gaspar Noe
Karen Aragon
Le Roy
Matthew Connors
Izaac Enciso
Robert Beatty

€18.00

Buy it

Terremoto 6. Dorothée Dupuis (ed.). Terremoto, Motto Books.

Posted in magazines on June 23rd, 2016
Tags: , ,

Terremoto 6_Motto books_1Terremoto 6_Motto books_2Terremoto 6_Motto books_7Terremoto 6_Motto books_6Terremoto 6_Motto books_5Terremoto 6_Motto books_4Terremoto 6_Motto books_3Terremoto 6_Motto books_8Terremoto 6_Motto books_9Terremoto 6_Motto books_10Terremoto 6_Motto books_11Terremoto 6_Motto books_12

 

The glare that a shadow can emit is evident in recent Latin American history, a history notoriously scored by oppression, violence, disappearances, and other painful secrets tossed into the gray areas of memory and to the margins of hegemonic historical accounts. In the shadow, you’re protected by the invisibility of marginalization—at the same time you’re made vulnerable by a lack of guarantees brought about through the neglect of the dominant power. The shadows that move through us are the constant reminder of what never changes: long-standing oppression and discrimination, perpetuated all around us in a political climate of abuse and tough luck. As we name them, draw their contours and seek to resolve their enigmas, we ask ourselves to what real end do we use artistic thought to gain awareness of those shadows? Can something change? Or are those ideas mere shadow play? 

Pigmentocracy in Contemporary Art

Susana Vargas Cervantes looks at the work of artists Zach Blas, Colectivo Zunga, Santiago Sierra and Erick Meyenberg through the concept of pigmentocracy. … — By Susana Vargas Cervantes

 

COMOClube

Amilcar Packer tells the story of Como_clube in Sao Paulo, a mutant platform for artistic creation and an environment of undisciplined living which favors free movement between genres, generations, political and socioeconomic situations, fostering performance-related productions. …

— By Amilcar Packer

 

Las Nietas de Nonó

Puerto Rican artists Sofia Gallisá and las Nietas de Nonó discuss their approach to the prison system in Puerto Rico and the cycle of poverty and racial and class discrimination that feeds it. …

— By Sofía Gallisá Muriente

 

Méthode Room

Guillaume Désanges talks about his experience developing the Méthode Room residency project at Archive House, within Theaster Gates’ Dorchester Project in South Side in Chicago. …

— Guillaume Désanges

 

Yɨsɨrihaɨ: Healing that rescues the shadow from genocide

Colombian artist Bárbara Santos gives an account of the making of the book Los Jaguares del Yuruparí (2015), which presents the outcome of more than 10 years of research conducted by indigenous young people from the communities of Pira-Parana in the Colombian Amazon -under the guidance of the traditional knowledge of their elders- on cultural and sacred knowledge related to the territory and its management. …

— By Bárbara Santos

 

 A discussion with contemporary Nicaraguan Artists

Mexican curator Oliver Martínez Kandt talks with Nicaraguan artists Raul Quintanilla, Patricia Belli, Fredman Barahona, Darling López and Alejandro de la Guerra about their relation with the social, ecological and cultural urgencies of their context. …

— By Oliver Martínez-Kandt

 

 

€8.00

Buy it

032c Magazine #30

Posted in art, distribution, fashion, magazines on June 8th, 2016
Tags: , , ,

032c_issue_30_motto_1032c_issue_30_motto_2032c_issue_30_motto_3032c_issue_30_motto_4032c_issue_30_motto_5032c_issue_30_motto_6032c_issue_30_motto_7032c_issue_30_motto_8032c_issue_30_motto_9032c_issue_30_motto_10

ISSUE #30 — Summer 2015/2016
An Innocent Mind Has No Fear

In celebration of its 30th issue, 032c and artist-director RALF SCHMERBERG teamed up to create “An Innocent Mind Has No Fear,” a proposal for the ultimate Berlin film with a libretto by writer HELENE HEGEMANN. It is a manifesto about life in the post-contemporary era, where cultural promiscuity has dissolved into a condition of spiritual bankruptcy. Heat and compression have melted the meaning from our past algorithms, while aimless citizens wander in search of a new morality. The bandwidth of pleasure-pain has become endless.

Welcome to 032c Issue XXX!

Artist STERLING RUBY shares his archive of workwear, a collection of clothing that appears as next century’s post-apocalyptic craft. Developed initially as a uniform for his Los Angeles studio, the garments are part of a larger, self-cannibalizing material practice that includes his sculptures and paintings.

Austerity bully, refugee haven, neither, or both? — In light of Germany’s newfound powerful and complex role on the world stage, journalist Joachim Bessing and sociologist Heinz Bude seek to untangle the psyche of a country through its mysterious figurehead leader, ANGELA MERKEL.

In the wake of Hood By Air’s sexually charged takeover of the shop windows at Barneys New York, creative directors SHAYNE OLIVER (HBA), DENNIS FREEDMAN (Barneys), and BABAK RADBOY (Telfar) discuss public transportation, dermatology, and the legacy of Helmut Lang over martini glasses filled with ceviche. Meanwhile, writer HANNAH BLACK unpacks the significance of Hood By Air’s silicone replicas of male models into a pyramid of fashion-commodity-death.

THE LOTTA-DELPHINE COMPLEX — At a time when industry wisdom is crowd-sourced and the consumer holds more power than ever before, 032c’s Jina Khayyer speaks to LVMH executive DELPHINE ARNAULT and mega-stylist LOTTA VOLKOVA, two equal yet opposite centers of gravity in the contemporary fashion landscape.

In tandem with his friends Jeff Koons, Jeffrey Deitch, and Maurizio Cattelan, the Cypriot industrialist and art collector DAKIS JOANNOU has turned an “unreasonable love for art” into a Zeitgeist-shaping pile of acquisitions. 032c’s Thom Bettridge travels to Greece at the apex of the financial crisis to uncover the mysteries behind the tinted windows of Joannou’s pop art battleship, Guilty.

“People, for me, are function. Is that awful?” — After being awarded Britain’s best mens- and womenswear designer in the same year, J.W. ANDERSON receives a visit from architect Jack Self, who administers a personality test at the designer’s home in London The verdict: Anderson is an accomplished devil’s advocate and a hyper-capitalist par excellence. Anderson explains why he prefers interviews to psychotherapy, and how the fashion industry is an autobahn: You can go as fast as you like, as long as you don’t take your hands off the wheel.

“It seems like the only way out is to speed up what is already at work”— Anthropologist JASON PINE shares his field research into homemade meth-cooking in rural Missouri and explains how a backwater drug epidemic is in fact the chemical embodiment of mainstream capitalism.

After bringing art criticism to the masses with Ways of Seeing, author and artist JOHN BERGER gave half of his 1972 Booker Prize money to the Black Panthers and used the other half to relocate to a village in the French Alps. Writer Niklas Maak brings us a portrait of Berger’s life as a rural futurist on the occasion of The Seasons in Quincy, a film initiated by his longtime friend Tilda Swinton.

COLLIER SCHORR and LOTTA VOLKOVA team up for an editorial feature, while enigmatic fashion designer CHRISTOPHE DECARNIN makes his debut as a fashion photographer in a celebration of the American West.

Juergen Teller makes peace with a soccer rival, a Renaissance accountant predicts the future of menswear, and the anti-aging industry performs a Swiss Air First Class takeover of the Bauhaus tradition — all this and more in SELECT, a 32-page bonanza of our favorite products of the season.

032c Issue 30 is available now, with a choice of two covers: COLLIER SCHORR shooting Gosha Rubchinskiy and Balanciaga on the left, and RALF SCHMERBERG shooting Gucci on the right.

12€
Buy it

Art Against Art #2. Taslima Ahmed, Manuel Gnam (eds.). Spring/Summer 2016.

Posted in art, Artist magazine, distribution, magazines on June 8th, 2016
Tags:

art_against_art_issue2_motto_1art_against_art_issue2_motto_2art_against_art_issue2_motto_3art_against_art_issue2_motto_4art_against_art_issue2_motto_5art_against_art_issue2_motto_6art_against_art_issue2_motto_7art_against_art_issue2_motto_8art_against_art_issue2_motto_9

EDITORIAL

When considering the art field as being a raft in speculative time, the tendency is to seek comfort in numbers, regressive ideas such as another return to painting[1] or hedging bets on all sides whilst pursuing an unreasonable personal growth fetish.

These are classic reactions to a perceived risk that arises as a result of readjusting to new data. Uncertainty, if left unmediated, will pose a risk not just to market stability but to conceptual stability as it becomes more and more difficult to differentiate between artists and ads; artworks and hype-objects; or content and sponsored content – keeping us in a state of high drama too complex to decode. For example artists who consciously use marketing strategies as art are contextually mixed up with masses of artists who simply run a marketing strategy. Or, equally, galleries with a reputation for long-term quality regularly use their weight to inflate very short-lived speculative art. It is in these differences that art barters itself off very quickly to sometimes uninteresting effects holding us in a certain inappropriate narrative if we are not careful.

Up until a hundred years ago, it was normal to assume that all art aimed at “beauty” or varying degrees of “representation” and that anything but, would not be considered art. Later, after The Fountain, this evolved into the politics of mass production leading to whatever fallacy that we have today – perhaps a speculative bias targeted at an erroneously projected future consensus. It may be worth considering ditching all retroactive rhetoric about “safe places” in favor of heightening one’s own form of perception (perhaps even through enhancement), to adapt to the new environment and to filter through informational debris.

Inside the art world…

9€
Buy it

Petunia #7. Dorothée Dupuis. Valérie Chartrain, Lili Reynaud Dewar, Victoria Dejaco (eds.)

Posted in art, Artist magazine, magazines, writing on June 1st, 2016
Tags:

petunia_7_motto_1 copypetunia_7_motto_1 copy.2petunia_7_motto_1 copy.3petunia_7_motto_1 copy.4petunia_7_motto_1 copy.5petunia_7_motto_1 copy.6petunia_7_motto_1 copy.7petunia_7_motto_1 copy.8petunia_7_motto_1 copy.9

 

THE ONLY AND FINEST ART AND ENTERTAINMENT FEMINIST MAGAZINE
WITH Caroline Mesquita, Grégoire Blunt & Emmy Skensved, Maité Garbayo, Marlie Mul, Temra Pavlovic, Amy Sillman, Dorothy Howard, Ramaya Tegegne, Philipp Timischl, Daniel Berndt, Deniz Unal, Geraldine Beck & Miriam Leonardi Frances Stark, Dorota Gawęda & Eglė Kulbokaitė Gill Karjevsky & Tali Keren, Deanna Havas & Haydée Marin-Lopez, Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen, Heather Guertin & Verena Dengler

5€
Buy it

mono.kultur #40 : EDMUND DE WAAL : W IS FOR WHITE. mono.kultur.

Posted in art, Artist magazine, magazines, Motto Berlin store, writing on June 1st, 2016
Tags:

monokultur_40_motto_1monokultur_40_motto_2monokultur_40_motto_3monokultur_40_motto_4monokultur_40_motto_5monokultur_40_motto_6monokultur_40_motto_7monokultur_40_motto_8

Edmund de Waal is a potter. His pots, plates, and vessels are the result of craft and mastership, but they are also so much more than that: they are experiments in form and function, abstractions of thoughts on silence and space, on repetition and failure, on substance and fragility, on memory contained.

Edmund de Waal is an artist. He arranges his objects in complex choreographies that are as mysterious as they are mesmerizing. Displayed in galleries and institutions worldwide, his considered installations play with architectural concerns, integrating ideas of space, light and obscurity.

Edmund de Waal is a writer. In 2010, his intimate memoir of a kind, ‘The Hare With Amber Eyes,’ intertwined the biography of a collection of netsuke figures with the biography of his family and became a surprise bestseller, winning several awards. His latest book, ‘The White Road,’ presents a highly personal and engaging research into the history of porcelain.

Whether he sculpts with words or with clay, what Edmund de Waal works with are concepts, ideas, and desires. In a body of work that is at odds with our times and yet oddly successful, his writings and objects overlap and integrate each other in an attempt to understand and transcend our complex relationship with objects and our surroundings.

In an interview with mono.kultur structured like an A-Z of notes and ideas, Edmund de Waal talked about his rules of attachment, the impossibility of repetition, and why ‘doubt’ is the most beautiful word.

Visually, the issue takes inspiration from that most perfect of materials: porcelain. Printed entirely in double-sided splendour, the two finishings of the paper – shiny gloss and smooth matt – evoke the texture of ceramics before and after glazing.

Interview by Mareike Dittmer / Artwork by Edmund de Waal / Design by Designbolaget

5€
Buy it

Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard

Posted in Artist magazine, magazines, Motto Berlin store, Motto Books, Uncategorized on May 30th, 2016
Tags: ,

Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). HarvardHarvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard 2Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard 3Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard 1Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard 9Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard 8

Editors: Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman Salkin
Publisher: Harvard University Graduate School of Design
Pages: 208

“Run for Cover!”
No. 42
S/S 2016

Table of Contents:
Editor’s note: Dreadful Design
Jennifer Sigler
Wide Open
Nancy Etcoff
Fortress London: The New US Embassy and the Rise of Counter-Terror Urbanism
Oliver Wainwright
Feeling Invaded
John Kuo Wei Tchen
Gimme Shelter: Refugee Architecture in Germany
Niklas Maak
Phobia and the City: Rome
Lars Lerup
Holding Fear
Sonja Dümpelmann
Unsettling Unsettlements
Marianne F. Potvin
Anthropocenophobia: The Stone Falls on the City
Renata Tyszczuk
Solitary in Solidarity
Daniel D’Oca
Fear Ebbs on the Skyline but Rises on the Ground
Blair Kamin
Get Me Out of Here: The Solemn Geography of Women in Horror Film
Caryn Coleman
Reading Jane Jabobs in the Era of #BlackLivesMatter
Stuart Schrader
Un-War
Krzysztof Wodiczko
Animal Eyes & Invisible Hunters
Eugénie Shinkle
Fearful Asymmetry: Insurgency and the Architectures of Terror
Joshua Comaroff
Die Noctuque
Enrique Ramirez
A Certain Darkness
Demdike Stare & Robert Gerard Pietrusko
Who’s Afraid of the Covered Face?
Maryam Monalisa Gharavi
Artifacts of Exclusion
Interboro Partners
Fear Is in the Detail
Francesca Hughes & Gergely Kovács
The Iconic Ghetto and the Stigma of Blackness
Elijah Anderson
A Toxic Patrimony
Dan Borelli
The Green Zone: Architectures of Precarious Politics
Amin Alsaden
How to Draw Medellín
Alejandro Echeverri & Alejandro Valdivieso
Mortal Cities
Arna Mačkić
Bringing Back the Front: Relieving the Great War
Justin Fowler
Home Safe
Geoff Manaugh
The Fall of Postmodernism and the New Empowerment
Michael Murphy
Building for the Total Breakdown
Jacob Lillemose
A State of Emergency
Léopold Lambert
Conflict Urbanism, Aleppo
Laura Kurgan
Nuclear Pillowcases
Andrew Wasserman
The Real Move
Elizabeth Streb & Chelsea Spencer
Fear, Faith, and Disaster Preparedness
Arif Khan
The House of One: Facing Fear
Lara Schrijver
Pastiche of Ghosts
Metahaven
Second Nature
Ralph Ghoche
Suspunk: Thinking with Suspicious Packages
Javier Arbona, Bryan Finocki, Nick Sowers
The Horror, the Horror
Bart Lootsma
Robert Smithson, Evel Knievel, and the Landscape of Reclamation
Edward Eigen
Kites
Reginald Dwayne Betts
Feared Spaces, Feared Bodies
Toni L. Griffin
Fear, Fire, and Forty-One Snakes: Notes on the Burning Theater
Thomas A. P. Van Leeuwen
Ambiguous Thresholds
Nuttinee Karnchanaporn

15 €
Buy it