ETOPS – Extended Operations II & ETOPS – Extended Operations III. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen.

Posted in art, distribution, magazines, Wholesale on August 13th, 2016
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ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_1ETOPS - Extended Operations III & ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_1ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_2ETOPS - Extended Operations III & ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_2ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_3ETOPS - Extended Operations III & ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_4ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_4ETOPS - Extended Operations III & ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_5ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_5ETOPS - Extended Operations III & ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_3ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_6ETOPS - Extended Operations III & ETOPS - Extended Operations 2. Matthew Evans (ed.). Yngve Holen._Motto Books_6

 

ETOPS, or Extended Operations, is artist Yngve Holen’s magazine about specialized industries today. Edited with Matthew Evans and designed by Per Törnberg, ETOPS is a qualitative and interview-based research project. Previous issues of ETOPS explored the commercial airline industry, plastic surgery, and pornography. The third issue is a travelogue about food and political ecology in the Amazon rainforest and the Andes. The publication project is made possible by the Hessische Kulturstiftung.

 

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A-or-ist Issue No. 2. A-or-ist.

Posted in distribution, Journals, magazines, Wholesale on August 10th, 2016
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A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_1A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_2A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_3A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_4A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_5A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_6A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_7A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_8A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_9A-or-ist Issue No. 2, A-or-ist, Netherlands, Text, The Thing, Park McArthur, Sophie Cundale,  Paul B. Preciado, Dorine van Meel, Darren Banks,  CK One,  Gena Rowlands, Ilja Karilampi,  Agnes Martin, Shulamith, 20593384_Motto Books_10

 

 

A-or-ist is a collective publication

The Thing – plasticité – Park McArthur – ubiquity – periods – Sophie Cundale – Pure Heroine – future girls – Paul B. Preciado – therapy – Dorine van Meel – disobedience – fans – not doing – Darren Banks – CK One – ritual – fridges – Tavi – Gena Rowlands – hypnosis – queer mysticism – Ilja Karilampi – Agnes Martin – swooning – Shulamith Firestone – adult babies

Extracts

Polysemous Synthetics (on Park McArthur’s ‘Poly’, Chisenhale Gallery, April 2016)
Jonathan P Watts

‘Poly’, from the Greek meaning ‘many’, already suggests the idea of multiplicity. Poly is the prefix of polymer; in various compound forms, synthetic polymers perform an omnipresent role in our daily lives. Is there a substance richer in meaning and metaphor? Plastic speaks of multiplicity and omnipresence. Plastics in textile blends wrap around our bodies, providing thresholds between the world and our skin. Gels – those weird polymer solids that flow – hold the form of the body. Although aware of Park’s political argument against metaphor, I couldn’t reconcile the literalness of material and the disavowal of its metaphorical resonances. Plastics are a fundamental ontological rug pull, so to speak. The widespread use of plastics following the second world war not only enabled new forms, but augured unforeseen possibilities of mimesis. In other words, plastic helps us to think about identity.

Mutational Media & DeepTime Thrombosis: On Darren Banks’s Object Cinema
Jamie Sutcliffe

Get the feeling we’ve been here before? The remote northerly location, the arrogant frontierism of a bunch of bearded scientists, the excavation of some ancient intelligence? Despite being a fantastically pointed, topical and originally scary in its own right, The Last Winter draws heavily on John Carpenter’s 1982 alien-infection classic The Thing, from its pacing, through its paranoia, to the perilous uncertainty of its final scene. The setting and situation may have changed, but we’re still involved in the same grievous plight of cosmological vulnerability. Casting a little grit onto the cultural tundra, letting the strata reveal itself, it turns out there’s a visible lineage that recedes from Carpenter’s own movie back through a hundred years of texts, comic book adaptations and films that replay the same story in which a group of scientists excavate a primordial life form that seeks its own survival by infecting human subjects. One could even go so far as to suggest that the story itself is a parasitic entity, employing human media as the impotent host of its own regenerative self-purpose.

Notes on Disobedient Children (Dorine van Meel, 2015)
Naomi Pearce

(Dorine) creates a cracked and empty landscape, a handful of pylons sparsely scattered, barely perceptible in the red fog. There’s no sun, or sky or horizon. Another image: a meshwork of untethered electricity cables, slack, inoperative. Cut to a heavenly futuristic landscape where the remnants of human institutions – a white wedding veil – float serenely free. There are no bodies here, just structures on a sliding scale of functionality. We look up from inside a rhizomatic cage or out at a far-reaching line of fences. These are monuments to construction, they mark boundaries but in all this emptiness it’s not clear what they separate, what orders they impose.

All the while crumbling, glitching audio mutates. The sound of movement, of things breaking, both digitally and physically, tectonic plates shifting, buildings falling, rubbish heaps accumulating.

According to Alice 2:The Scent of Ubiquity
Alice Hattrick

Nothing much changes in the minutes and hours after atomization. It is ‘green’ and citrus – lemon and bergamot – and then slightly floral. An hour later it becomes woodier before it is basically nothing. L’Eau d’Issey (1992) was just as ubiquitous in the 1990s and much more interesting: a whole flower – stem and bloom – and way dirtier than its name suggests. The only decent descriptor I can think of for CK One is ‘CK One’. It sits on top of your skin and refuses to have anything to do with you. No part of it sticks, stays, or really changes. And then I realize: it’s not supposed to. CK One is no one’s signature scent. It is pure ubiquity. It is the definition of blending in. Wearing CK One, I have the thought that this is in fact the opposite of perfume.

Period Piece
Hannah Gregory

Looking back to the bloody patterns of Instagram and Tumblr, it seems that the elsewhere rehearsed prescription of social media as contemporary ritual (inglorious ritual) fits. These rhythmic performances are linked to the public-private life of the selfie generation, sure, but they are more than a narcissistic gesture or appeal for attention. Sociologist Karen Gregory has suggested that social media helps elaborate ‘an improvised narrative arc of personal spiritual development [which] can mitigate the dislocation and desperation of precarity.’ In this reading, online expressions are immediately reified as ‘one’s [provisional] life story’ is converted into social or actual capital for the users or the platforms. While the period posts do act as an outlet for an alienating experience, they resist becoming just another instantiation of self-branding.Their gridded repetitions try to put disorder in order, and their shared hashtags of #menstrala and #periodart represent what it might mean to bleed collectively. Un-pretty and undesirable, the images make visible what society prefers to censor.

A Woman Under the Influence (on Sophie Cundale’s After Picasso, God, 2016)
Amy Budd

The iconoclastic title After Picasso, God betrays the simple narrative structure and prosaic content of a film following a day in the life of a woman undergoing hypnosis to quit smoking. Whereas in previous works the artist mostly remained behind the camera, only occasionally making her presence felt in Prologue by interrupting improvised scenes with one line quips and directions, After Picasso, God sees Cundale perform the role of non-verbal protagonist, smoking her way through South London’s public and private spaces.

Queer Mysticism, Feral Communism and [the Body of Text]
Caspar Heinemann

A grounding statement is: Your body is literally hollow; another is: You literally do not have a body but rather millions.This gets more intense when you disregard Cartesian dualism and remember you don’t have but rather are bodies. ‘Your’ ‘body’ is constituted by organisms of many different genders and none. Literally literally literally literally and a few metaphorically.

Swooning
Lizzie Homersham

To my recovered self and to ideas about the obligation to care, Firestone’s ‘Swooning’ is like (Agnes) Martin’s Homage to Life: remarkable for making imperative the need to visualize a problem in order to put it to rest. Remarkable for being the blanket you might wrap around yourself when, echoing Claudia Rankine, ‘you are alone and too tired even to turn on any of your devices, you let yourself linger in a past stacked among your pillows.’ The black blanket you might share? By posting ‘Swooning’ to Twitter, and writing about it here, I wanted to put Firestone’s edges and the tempting prospect of disappearance into dialogue with some questions I have about social media. If that’s not too much of a flight of mind.

 

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OnCurating @ Motto Berlin. 23.07.2016

Posted in events, magazines, Motto Berlin event on July 15th, 2016
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On Curating @ Motto Berlin. July 23rd from 7pm

OnCurating #31- Spheres of Estrangement: Art, Politics and Curating

With contributions from

Josephine Baker-Heaslip, Jonas Becker, Franco ‘Bifo’ Beradi, Benjamin T. Busch, Dan Bustillo, Lilian Cameron, Joey Cannizzaro, Carson Chan, Jeni Fulton, Ken Gonzales-Day, Matthew Hanson, Anke Hennig, Alistair Hudson, Alison Hugill, Suzana Milevska, Jared Pappas Kelley, Penny Rafferty, PUNK IS DADA, Claire Ruud, Jack Schneider, Adrian Shaw, Paul Stewart, Sam Thorne.
Editors: Jonas Becker, Benjamin T. Busch, Matthew Hanson, Penny Rafferty, Paul Stewart

Today’s estrangement is a fully incorporated component of the modern experience, a stimulant for ‘surplus alienation’. Therefore, this issue asks what artistic, architectural and curatorial approaches to estrangement offer current discourse in organisation, aesthetics and activism. The articles unpack estrangement for the political, social and cultural sprint of our time.

Publisher: Dorothee Richter
Co-Publisher: Michael BirchallRonald Kolb
Editors: Jonas Becker, Benjamin T. Busch, Matthew Hanson, Penny Rafferty, Paul Stewart
Proofreading: Stephanie Carwin
Graphic Design: Ronald Kolb, Biotop 3000

 

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Mould Map 4 – Eurozone Spezial. Hugh Frost & Leon Sadler. Landfill Editions.

Posted in Artist magazine, graphic design, magazines on July 8th, 2016
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A book about Europe and its possible futures.
Featuring newly commissioned comics, art and graphics from; Leon Sadler, Edwin Burdis, Daniel Swan, Michael Willis, Patrick Crotty, Grace Wilson, Dan Mitchell, Will Sweeney, Ed Fornieles, Brecht Vandenbroucke, Yannick Val Gesto with Eva Munz, Sany, Amalia Ulman, Hanna K, MOSA, Gwenaël Rattke, Stathis Tsemberlidis, Yuri Pattison, Suzanne Treister, Jody Barton, New Scenario, Stefan Sadler, Jonathan Djob Nkondo, Gabriel Corbera, Pierre Vanni, Roope Eronen and Viktor Hachmang.

Contextualised by features on both near-future speculative / design fiction and historical counterculture movements including; Huw Wahl on 60s inflatable art collective Action Space, Federico Pagello on Frigidaire Magazine and comics of the radical left in 70s Italy, a selection of activist ephemera from the stock of Mayfair dealer Carl Williams at Maggs Brothers, Ingo Niermann in conversation with Matilda Tjäder about the origins and development of the Sternberg Solutions series, Dunne & Raby and the use of illustration within their United Micro Kingdoms project and finally a selection of works from the 2014 White Cube exhibition by Gilbert & George — Scapegoating Pictures For London.

Edited by Hugh Frost & Leon Sadler. Graphic design by Hugh Frost.

18.00€

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Mousse 54. Edoardo Bonaspetti (Ed.). Mousse Magazine.

Posted in 2016, distribution, magazines on June 28th, 2016
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IEVA MISEVIČIŪTĖ
Character Studies of Primeval Life Form
by Jacquelyn Ross

EXTEND, EXCEED, ENHANCE: PROSTHETICS AND SCULPTURE
by Lisa Le Feuvre

ANNE IMHOF
Choreographed layers
by Hans Ulrich Obrist

RAYMOND BOISJOLY, TANYA LUKIN LINKLATER, WALTER SCOTT
Native North America
by Andrew Berardini, Richard William Hill and Candice Hopkins

INSIDE TO OUTSIDE TO INSIDE
by Jens Hoffmann

NEW SCENARIO
Curating Holes
by Melanie Bühler

ROLE PLAY
by Maurizio Cattelan, Liam Gillick, Thomas Demand, Barbara Bloom, Christian Jankowski, Elmgreen&Dragset, Michelle Grabner, Tobias Rehberger, Ugo Rondinone, Harrell Fletcher, John Miller, Paulina Olowska

RONALD JONES
What You See Is What You See
by Krist Gruijthuijsen

GARY INDIANA
I Can Give You Anything But Love
by Andrew Durbin

WILLA NASATIR
Psychic Junkyards
by Lauren Cornell

RAGNA BLEY
An Idiosyncratic Abecedary
by Filipa Ramos

NOAH BARKER
Projecting an Island from Another
by Mark Beasley

ISIAH MEDINA
The impossible is the only (no-)thing that ever happens
by Pia Bolognesi

ME
by Dieter Roelstraete

SHIFTING BACKGROUNDS
by Anselm Franke

NOBODY IS SLEEPING IN THE SKY
by Geoffrey Farmer and Dora García

NOW, I AM AFRAID…
by Chus Martínez

CECILIA BENGOLEA AND FRANÇOIS CHAIGNAUD
Emotional Aesthetics
by Kathy Noble

MORAG KEIL AND GEORGIE NETTELL
Domestic Battlegrounds
by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen

AN ESSAY ON DRESS-UP AND OTHER THINGS
by Sabrina Tarasoff

 

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Tunica Magazine #5. Jose C. Garcia (ed.). Tunica Studio.

Posted in design, distribution, magazines on June 23rd, 2016
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TUNICA presents an art of Individuals. We stand for the reality of the present.
Absolute: The new egos and the melodrama of modernity is the Exploitation of vulgarity, the Improvement of life…
TUNICA is created for this timeless fundamental Artist that exists in everybody.
Unconditional: Popular art does not mean the art of the poor people.
TUNICA is a cape of good hope.
Trust: We need the unconsciousness of humanity. Their animalistic stupidity and dreams, futurism, magic and life!
Staying power! Brave Comrades!
Long live TUNICA!

Contributors:

James Orlando
Sita Abellan
Louisa Gagliardi
Takanori Okuwaki
Roberto Piqueras
Eme Rock
Yung Beef aka Fernandito Kit Kat
Eyedress
Prefuse 73
Ilja Karilampi
Terranova
Wickerham & Lomax
Alexa Karolinski
Gaspar Noe
Karen Aragon
Le Roy
Matthew Connors
Izaac Enciso
Robert Beatty

€18.00

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Terremoto 6. Dorothée Dupuis (ed.). Terremoto, Motto Books.

Posted in magazines on June 23rd, 2016
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The glare that a shadow can emit is evident in recent Latin American history, a history notoriously scored by oppression, violence, disappearances, and other painful secrets tossed into the gray areas of memory and to the margins of hegemonic historical accounts. In the shadow, you’re protected by the invisibility of marginalization—at the same time you’re made vulnerable by a lack of guarantees brought about through the neglect of the dominant power. The shadows that move through us are the constant reminder of what never changes: long-standing oppression and discrimination, perpetuated all around us in a political climate of abuse and tough luck. As we name them, draw their contours and seek to resolve their enigmas, we ask ourselves to what real end do we use artistic thought to gain awareness of those shadows? Can something change? Or are those ideas mere shadow play? 

Pigmentocracy in Contemporary Art

Susana Vargas Cervantes looks at the work of artists Zach Blas, Colectivo Zunga, Santiago Sierra and Erick Meyenberg through the concept of pigmentocracy. … — By Susana Vargas Cervantes

 

COMOClube

Amilcar Packer tells the story of Como_clube in Sao Paulo, a mutant platform for artistic creation and an environment of undisciplined living which favors free movement between genres, generations, political and socioeconomic situations, fostering performance-related productions. …

— By Amilcar Packer

 

Las Nietas de Nonó

Puerto Rican artists Sofia Gallisá and las Nietas de Nonó discuss their approach to the prison system in Puerto Rico and the cycle of poverty and racial and class discrimination that feeds it. …

— By Sofía Gallisá Muriente

 

Méthode Room

Guillaume Désanges talks about his experience developing the Méthode Room residency project at Archive House, within Theaster Gates’ Dorchester Project in South Side in Chicago. …

— Guillaume Désanges

 

Yɨsɨrihaɨ: Healing that rescues the shadow from genocide

Colombian artist Bárbara Santos gives an account of the making of the book Los Jaguares del Yuruparí (2015), which presents the outcome of more than 10 years of research conducted by indigenous young people from the communities of Pira-Parana in the Colombian Amazon -under the guidance of the traditional knowledge of their elders- on cultural and sacred knowledge related to the territory and its management. …

— By Bárbara Santos

 

 A discussion with contemporary Nicaraguan Artists

Mexican curator Oliver Martínez Kandt talks with Nicaraguan artists Raul Quintanilla, Patricia Belli, Fredman Barahona, Darling López and Alejandro de la Guerra about their relation with the social, ecological and cultural urgencies of their context. …

— By Oliver Martínez-Kandt

 

 

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032c Magazine #30

Posted in art, distribution, fashion, magazines on June 8th, 2016
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ISSUE #30 — Summer 2015/2016
An Innocent Mind Has No Fear

In celebration of its 30th issue, 032c and artist-director RALF SCHMERBERG teamed up to create “An Innocent Mind Has No Fear,” a proposal for the ultimate Berlin film with a libretto by writer HELENE HEGEMANN. It is a manifesto about life in the post-contemporary era, where cultural promiscuity has dissolved into a condition of spiritual bankruptcy. Heat and compression have melted the meaning from our past algorithms, while aimless citizens wander in search of a new morality. The bandwidth of pleasure-pain has become endless.

Welcome to 032c Issue XXX!

Artist STERLING RUBY shares his archive of workwear, a collection of clothing that appears as next century’s post-apocalyptic craft. Developed initially as a uniform for his Los Angeles studio, the garments are part of a larger, self-cannibalizing material practice that includes his sculptures and paintings.

Austerity bully, refugee haven, neither, or both? — In light of Germany’s newfound powerful and complex role on the world stage, journalist Joachim Bessing and sociologist Heinz Bude seek to untangle the psyche of a country through its mysterious figurehead leader, ANGELA MERKEL.

In the wake of Hood By Air’s sexually charged takeover of the shop windows at Barneys New York, creative directors SHAYNE OLIVER (HBA), DENNIS FREEDMAN (Barneys), and BABAK RADBOY (Telfar) discuss public transportation, dermatology, and the legacy of Helmut Lang over martini glasses filled with ceviche. Meanwhile, writer HANNAH BLACK unpacks the significance of Hood By Air’s silicone replicas of male models into a pyramid of fashion-commodity-death.

THE LOTTA-DELPHINE COMPLEX — At a time when industry wisdom is crowd-sourced and the consumer holds more power than ever before, 032c’s Jina Khayyer speaks to LVMH executive DELPHINE ARNAULT and mega-stylist LOTTA VOLKOVA, two equal yet opposite centers of gravity in the contemporary fashion landscape.

In tandem with his friends Jeff Koons, Jeffrey Deitch, and Maurizio Cattelan, the Cypriot industrialist and art collector DAKIS JOANNOU has turned an “unreasonable love for art” into a Zeitgeist-shaping pile of acquisitions. 032c’s Thom Bettridge travels to Greece at the apex of the financial crisis to uncover the mysteries behind the tinted windows of Joannou’s pop art battleship, Guilty.

“People, for me, are function. Is that awful?” — After being awarded Britain’s best mens- and womenswear designer in the same year, J.W. ANDERSON receives a visit from architect Jack Self, who administers a personality test at the designer’s home in London The verdict: Anderson is an accomplished devil’s advocate and a hyper-capitalist par excellence. Anderson explains why he prefers interviews to psychotherapy, and how the fashion industry is an autobahn: You can go as fast as you like, as long as you don’t take your hands off the wheel.

“It seems like the only way out is to speed up what is already at work”— Anthropologist JASON PINE shares his field research into homemade meth-cooking in rural Missouri and explains how a backwater drug epidemic is in fact the chemical embodiment of mainstream capitalism.

After bringing art criticism to the masses with Ways of Seeing, author and artist JOHN BERGER gave half of his 1972 Booker Prize money to the Black Panthers and used the other half to relocate to a village in the French Alps. Writer Niklas Maak brings us a portrait of Berger’s life as a rural futurist on the occasion of The Seasons in Quincy, a film initiated by his longtime friend Tilda Swinton.

COLLIER SCHORR and LOTTA VOLKOVA team up for an editorial feature, while enigmatic fashion designer CHRISTOPHE DECARNIN makes his debut as a fashion photographer in a celebration of the American West.

Juergen Teller makes peace with a soccer rival, a Renaissance accountant predicts the future of menswear, and the anti-aging industry performs a Swiss Air First Class takeover of the Bauhaus tradition — all this and more in SELECT, a 32-page bonanza of our favorite products of the season.

032c Issue 30 is available now, with a choice of two covers: COLLIER SCHORR shooting Gosha Rubchinskiy and Balanciaga on the left, and RALF SCHMERBERG shooting Gucci on the right.

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Art Against Art #2. Taslima Ahmed, Manuel Gnam (eds.). Spring/Summer 2016.

Posted in art, Artist magazine, distribution, magazines on June 8th, 2016
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EDITORIAL

When considering the art field as being a raft in speculative time, the tendency is to seek comfort in numbers, regressive ideas such as another return to painting[1] or hedging bets on all sides whilst pursuing an unreasonable personal growth fetish.

These are classic reactions to a perceived risk that arises as a result of readjusting to new data. Uncertainty, if left unmediated, will pose a risk not just to market stability but to conceptual stability as it becomes more and more difficult to differentiate between artists and ads; artworks and hype-objects; or content and sponsored content – keeping us in a state of high drama too complex to decode. For example artists who consciously use marketing strategies as art are contextually mixed up with masses of artists who simply run a marketing strategy. Or, equally, galleries with a reputation for long-term quality regularly use their weight to inflate very short-lived speculative art. It is in these differences that art barters itself off very quickly to sometimes uninteresting effects holding us in a certain inappropriate narrative if we are not careful.

Up until a hundred years ago, it was normal to assume that all art aimed at “beauty” or varying degrees of “representation” and that anything but, would not be considered art. Later, after The Fountain, this evolved into the politics of mass production leading to whatever fallacy that we have today – perhaps a speculative bias targeted at an erroneously projected future consensus. It may be worth considering ditching all retroactive rhetoric about “safe places” in favor of heightening one’s own form of perception (perhaps even through enhancement), to adapt to the new environment and to filter through informational debris.

Inside the art world…

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Petunia #7. Dorothée Dupuis. Valérie Chartrain, Lili Reynaud Dewar, Victoria Dejaco (eds.)

Posted in art, Artist magazine, magazines, writing on June 1st, 2016
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THE ONLY AND FINEST ART AND ENTERTAINMENT FEMINIST MAGAZINE
WITH Caroline Mesquita, Grégoire Blunt & Emmy Skensved, Maité Garbayo, Marlie Mul, Temra Pavlovic, Amy Sillman, Dorothy Howard, Ramaya Tegegne, Philipp Timischl, Daniel Berndt, Deniz Unal, Geraldine Beck & Miriam Leonardi Frances Stark, Dorota Gawęda & Eglė Kulbokaitė Gill Karjevsky & Tali Keren, Deanna Havas & Haydée Marin-Lopez, Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen, Heather Guertin & Verena Dengler

5€
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