Potpuri No. 01

Posted in art, magazines on December 4th, 2022
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Gazeta 01, 09/22

“Potpuri” is a collaborative publication of Termokiss Community Center (Prishtina, Kosovo) and the Master in Transdisciplinarity of the Zurich University of the Arts (Switzerland) which is published as a printed magazine and a website (www.termokissresearch.club).

Project Team: Argnes Ahmeti, Thassiannira Araujo Sousa, Bujar Aruqaj, Ardita Avdija, Rozafa Basha, Caroline Baur, Anna Bertram, Frederic Bron, Lea Burkhalter, Mara Djukaric, Njomza Dragusha, Fisnik Eger, Niştiman Erdede, Hannah Essler, Nicole Frei, Christian Gieben, Sofia Hachemi, Ervina Halili, Etrit Hasler, Valentin Hehl, Adelina Ismaili, Tinka Kelmendi, Diona Kusari, Ludwig Lederer, Nora Longatti, Roxani Marty Pavlaki, Kushtrim Memeti, Elisa Pezza, Merlin Pohl, Era Qena, Jan Reimann, Marcel Rickli , Basil Rogger, Tosca Salihu, Jehisson Santacruz Giraldo, Shpat Shkodra, Tobias Stumpp, Endrit Tasholli, Paula Thomaka, Arian Vula, Judith Weidmann, Wiebke Wiesner.

Contributors: Thassiannira Araujo Sousa, Ardita Avdija, Frederick Bron, Njomza Dragusha, Fisnik Eger, Niştiman Erdede, Hannah Essler, Fabian Gutscher, Emanuel Haab, Adelina Ismaili, Tinka Kelmendi, Nikola Koruga, Diona Kusari, Nora Longatti, Roxani Marty Pavlaki, Elisa Pezza, Era Qena, Marcel Rickli, Shpat Shkodra, Endrit Tasholli, Arian Vula, Judith Weidmann.

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Korazon #1. MFAE. Ramona

Posted in Artist magazine, magazines, politics on November 24th, 2022
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Korazon #1
a sensual and political magazine

With KORAZON, we want to dive into topics previously discussed by Amauta’s writers within the current context of cultural activities no longer being subsidized by the government, but rather turned into for-profit projects. In this mag, we want to show how crucial identity and collective culture are to a country and how important it is to invest in us as a multicultural territory. This platform’s aim is to bring attention to issues that affect us as Peruvians, especially those that we hardly emphasize and pinpoint as oppressive or holding us back as a community.

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Local Stickerbook #3. Yan Tashtoush, Alexandra Sakara, Katia Samogon, Stasiya Lutova (Eds.)

Posted in art, Artist's book, books on November 18th, 2022
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Local Stickerbook is an independent magazine exhibiting works of contemporary Ukrainian artists. For each edition, around twenty artists are selected to represent their creations through the sticker format. The project was launched in February, 2021 as an initiative of Kyiv-based artists and curators. Since that time, the team successfully hosted several multi-format events uniting various local musicians, artists and enthusiasts to explore metamodernistic ideas and approaches.

The Local Stickerbook team also provides artists and their families with financial aid. The team intends to create a special financial support foundation giving a part of the profits and donations to the Ukrainian artists in need. Together we make a difference!

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LOG 55. Cynthia Davidson (Ed.). Anyone Corporation

Posted in architecture, magazines on October 12th, 2022
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From a bridge to blockchain, Amazonian urbanism to artificial intelligence, Log 55 recognizes the vast concerns of architecture today. This 176-page open issue, which includes a 16-page color insert, compiles essays, building and exhibition reviews, and remarks by 25 architects, theorists, and artists from around the world. In Berlin, Tim Altenhof critiques the newly rebuilt Humboldt Forum; in Los Angeles, Victor J. Jones reviews Michael Maltzan’s Ribbon of Light Viaduct; in New York, Cynthia Davidson visits the late Virgil Abloh’s “social sculpture,” and Thomas de Monchaux views “Anthony Ames Fifty Paintings”; in Quito, Ana María Durán Calisto and Sanford Kwinter draw inspiration from Indigenous territorial intelligence; in Rotterdam, Christophe Van Gerrewey reflects on MVRDV’s Boijmans Depot; in Taipei, Kwang-Yu King compares two new cultural venues by OMA and RUR; and in Tokyo, Jan Vranoský pens a postmortem for Kisho Kurokawa’s Nakagin Capsule Tower. Matthew Allen looks to computer science for a way out of the theory-practice divide; Simone Brott considers the ways NFTs will change architectural practice; Karel Klein draws parallels between memory and AI; and Marija Marič warns against digitized real estate fractions.

In addition, a special section guest edited by Francesco Marullo is devoted to Notes on the Desert. The section, which raises issues of climate change and the extraction economy, includes essays by architect Nathan Friedman on the US-Mexico border, artist Kim Stringfellow on jackrabbit homesteads, feminist scholar Traci Brynne Voyles on the 49ers, and architect Lydia Xynogala speaking for a desert toad; photo essays by the Center for Land Use Interpretation on nuclear tombs and by photographer Susan Lipper on desert utopia; as well as an interview with photographer Richard Misrach on his Cantos series.

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Pages Magazine – Set.Nasrin Tabatabai, Babak Afrassiabi (Eds.). Pages Magazine

Posted in art, Artist magazine, Artist's book, magazines, writing on June 30th, 2022
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Pages Magazine Set

Pages, the bilingual, Farsi and English, artist magazine since 2004.

Edited by Nasrin Tabatabai and Babak Afrassiabi.

– Pages #1: Public & Private
– Pages #2: Play & Locations
– Pages #3: Desire & Change
– Pages #4: Voice
– Pages #5: On the Verge of Vertigo
– Pages #6: Eventual Spaces
– Pages #7: In Translation
– Pages #8: When Historical
– Pages #9: Seep
– Pages #10: Inhale

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Zweikommasieben #25. Guy Schwegler, Helena Julian, Mathis Neuhaus (Eds.). Präsens Editionen; Motto Books

Posted in magazines, Motto Books, music on June 14th, 2022
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When starting to work on the 25th issue of our magazine, we were discussing whether there should be some sort of content to celebrate this milestone and the past ten years leading up to it. But, as further reading will indicate, there are no texts praising past issues or reflections on the musical developments we documented over the years. However, the anniversary helps in presenting the underlying theme of this issue. As loyal readers might know, zweikommasieben started out as a fanzine and aspired to keep this character somewhat alive. Therefore, in zweikommasieben #25, we would like to reflect on various aspects of what fandom entails.

As fans, the authors, editors, and photographers of this magazine are dependent on artists ­— niche or mainstream ­— to be willing to have their practice documented. To put it bluntly: if they don’t want to speak to us, there is not much we can do. Likewise, and without overestimating the impact of our small publication, it might have positive consequences for artists to be featured in zweikommasieben, which is not simply a unidirectional channel between fans and artists: over the years some artists highlighted their own fandom, interviewing other artists they admire for this very magazine, while some contributors developed artistic practices which led them to having fans on their own.

Such an ever-changing web of dependencies is highlighted on the following pages. This edition features a text by media theorist and artist DeForrest Brown Jr. dedicated to the multiple talents of singer-songwriter Dawn Richard: an exploration of why fans could be drawn to her practice over the past 15 years. Jasmin Hoek visits a new museum in Amsterdam that is dedicated to techno and club culture to investigate whether such an institution can be true to something we all have been fans of. In Anna Froelicher’s interview with Price, the artist elaborates on how he plays with both institutions’ and fans’ conceptualization of his music. The complexities of being a fan not only relate to other people and institutions but also to oneself and one’s personal development. In a new essay, Friedemann Dupelius uses his ever-evolving fascination with trance to reflect on the genre’s current status quo.

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The Funambulist #41 – Decentering the U.S. Léopold Lambert (Ed.). The Funambulist

Posted in critique, editions, magazines, politic, politics, writing on May 30th, 2022
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The question that motivates this issue is simple: how come so many of us outside the settler colony called the United States of America, are so deeply influenced by and interpret our own contexts through the political ‘software’ created by U.S.-based academics and activists? The goal here is less to disqualify this U.S. political framework, than to demonstrate that the successful ways through which it analyzes its own context may not be as useful when analyzing other situations. Throughout the issue, we aim to reflect on U.S. exceptionalism, including in its own anti-imperialist critique (Zoé Samudzi), on what Blackness misses when it is mostly centered on African American espitemologies (Cases Rebelles), on transfused U.S.-forged concepts of “brownness” or “BIPOC” (Sinthujan Varatharajah), on illusory attempts to translate struggles into (U.S.) English (Bekriah Mawasi), on the complete blind spot casteism constitutes in this U.S. ‘software’ (Shaista Aziz Patel & Vijeta Kumar), on the need for a pluriversal approach of queerness (Rahul Rao)… Even within the U.S., the political framework that categorizes all people (from Indigenous people to white settlers) coming from the south of its border as “Latinx” needs to be problematized as settler colonial creations (Floridalma Boj Lopez). With this issue, we aim at doing just that: not letting go of the precious epistemologies U.S.-based thinkers have brought us, but simply decentering them to favor the pluriversality of our influences.

The cover was created for us by Michael DeForge and the News from the Fronts section brings us reflections on Taiwan (Szu-Han Ho & Meng-Yao Chuang), Cameroon (Ethel-Ruth Tawe), the Ainu (Kanako Uzawa) and Fusako Shigenobu’s political legacy, a few weeks before her release from prison in Japan (May Shigenobu).

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XTENSION PHOTOZINE #1. Dr. Boerek & Mr. Holiday. Self – published.

Posted in magazines, photography, Uncategorized on February 10th, 2022
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Mixed photos/photo-collages from around the globe.

Bonus: QR- code for exclusive music-track to download 
Limited on 50 pieces/ numbered 
Comes with stickers

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PROVENCE AW 19/20

Posted in magazines on October 25th, 2019
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PROVENCE AW 19/20

PROVENCE AW 19/20 is more than punk adjacent. We spent an afternoon at home with Pietro Mattioli, poring over portraits of club-goers he took during the last years of the 1970s at Club Hey, Zürich’s first punk and new wave nightclub. These images are juxtaposed with more recent shots of patrons at House Of Mixed Emotions, a series of club nights in Zürichs Longstreet Bar.

Punk manifests in many ways, and apolitical it is not. A study of the genre could not have been dedicated to paper without considering its intersectional nuance. In two interviews, Big Joanie, the Black-British feminist punk trio and Sissi Zoebeli of Thema Selection discuss the inevitability of activist pursuit as marginalized people in specific creative and temporal contexts. In conversation with Anne Gruber, Ulrike Ottinger waxes nostalgic on her feminist and decolonial education, as well as her seminal 1977 film, Madame X—An Absolute Ruler. The two met at Ottinger’s home on Bodensee, at the foot of the Alps.

Six postcards, conceived by Edgars Gluhovs, showing different crops of an image of the long-missing Lord Lucan have been scattered freely amongst the pages of this publication. Some things you’ve got to work for, others simply drop into your lap.

In the LITERATURE section of this punk-themed edition of PROVENCE, writer, curator, publicist, and editor, Hans-Christian Dany, offers a translated excerpt from his latest book, MA-1 Mode und Uniform, which is dedicated to the bomber jacket. “Deception and camouflage are part of the game when no one is supposed to know all too well how anyone else pays the rent”. Overleaf, in a passage from When Surface Was Depth (2002), London-based novelist Michael Bracewell reflects on the relationship between art, counter-cultures and subcultures, and their liquidation into a mainstream.

We have no less than three editorials in ART & FASHION, two of which are dedicated to a single designer. Mikael Gregorsky shoots Aganovich, avant-garde haute-couture, styled by Alessia Ansalone; Kristina Nagel takes her lens to experimental designer Lou de Bètoly’s latest collection, styled by our fashion editor Nina Hollensteiner; lastly, Nadine Fraczkowski journeys to a small village near Düsseldorf to capture Leila, a nineteen-year-old gymnastics enthusiast.

IN-HOUSE furthers our investigation into the nature of the contemporary gallery, which we pursued in the previous two issues. This time, we explore the phenomenon of in-house magazines founded by galleries and art institutions. We speak with Lionel Bovier, director of the MAMCO in Geneva, and Randy Kennedy, executive editor of Ursula, Hauser & Wirth’s new publication, to gain insight as to this recent art world industry trend.

To control which stories are and are not told is a great responsibility. Kari Rittenbach offers a view from the other side of the desk, with a distillate of her rejected pitches and unfinished articles—the stories that never reached a platform beyond the inboxes of her editors.

Following this course, we’ve included REVIEW, a section comprising contributions by artists, curators and critics who we invited to challenge the format of the contemporary exhibition review.

On a trip to Hangzhou, China, we visited Li Lin, the art collector and founder of JNBY. Meanwhile, in Beijing, curator Egija Inzule spoke to Anna Eschbach and Antoine Angerer of I: project space about their latest initiative, The Nightlife Residency, an interdisciplinary project focused on extracting the social potential of the city’s club-culture through a contemporary art practice. Further south, Wang Gongquan, proprietor of the Tsingpu Retreat offered advice as to the tricky business of balancing a public civil rights activism presence with a foray into the luxury hospitality business—what’s a man to do?

Hannes Grassegger wears flip-flops and makes notes on Bitcoin from Richard Branson’s island refuge, and over in Austria, our deputy editor Olamiju Fajemisin questions Ei Arakawa and Sarah Chow on the union of magic and concept from a medieval castle-cum-summer school atop a hill in the middle of Salzburg. Read all about it in REPORT.

PROVENCE. Biannual. Subscribe. Sorry.

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BLACK & BLUE #4. R E V O L U T I O N. BLACK & BLUE

Posted in distribution, magazines on August 17th, 2015
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The latest BLACK & BLUE anthology, REVOLUTION, includes pieces from over 50 authors working internationally. It explores the theme of Revolution through partial-encounters and tangents: poems, storytelling and fragments, building into a conceptually disparate but unified collection of voices, turned manual for Revolution now.

A NEW ANTHOLOGY OF REVOLUTIONARY CREATIVE LITERATURE IN SEVEN PARTS: FATHERS| CHILDREN|FUCKERS|WOLVES LIBERTINES MONSTERS|THE DEAD|NO PLACES|PLANTS & FLOWERS.

REVOLUTION IS BLACK & BLUE’S 4TH PUBLICATION.
IT IS A POETIC MANUAL ON REVOLUTION FEATURING THE WORK OF OVER 50 AUTHORS FROM AROUND THE WORLD.

A CELEBRATION OF CONTEMPORARY CREATIVE WRITING, A CALL FOR SOCIAL CHANGE. REVOLUTION.

Contributors: Julius Kalamarz, The Bonnets of Bonnie Dundee, Tom O’Bedlam, Scherezade Siobhan, Dean Fee, Eduardo C. Corral, Joseph Briggs, Justin Sealey, Amy McCauley, Neil Clarkson – poem
Jasper Watkins, Craig Hellier, Molly Nilsson, Poppy Cockburn, Michael Naughten Shanks, Rudrapriya Rathore, Lucy Wainger, Brian Patten, Gosia Nowicka, Terry Jones, Jane Flett, Adrian Slatcher, Annette Lapointe, Charlotte Rowland, Peter Lockwood, Imogen Cassels, Jan Lete, Stephen Watt, Krishan Coupland, Yam Pikle, James Mullard, Andy Owen Cook, J. D. A. Winslow, Andreea Mateescu Jones, Ariel Dawn, Die Booth, Steve Komarnyckyj, Lillian Necakov, Antony Owen, Sean Burn, Toby Martinez de las Rivas, Manuel Forcano, Anna Lowe, Lara Popovic, Anna Pickles Harvey, Charles Bane Jr., Julia Tolo, Louis Jenkins, Ted Stenson, Paul Zits, Jodie Matthews, Beryl O’Connell, Greta Bellamacina, Robert Montgomery, John W. Stuart, Kevin Yuen Kit Lo, Kerry O’Connor, Lillian Wilkie

Edition of 1500

€13.00

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