Panorama (The Right of View), Istanbul 2010. Amt _ project (ed.) Sputnik Editions

Posted in books, distribution, exhibitions, writing on January 30th, 2016
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A panorama of the city, a public platform, a dysfunctional lookout, blocking the actual view but confronting the viewer with textual observations of the city and the condition of the view in Istanbul, „Panorama (The Right of View)“ was a traveling attraction and an architectonic sculpture. After standing in Kadiköy, on the Asian shore from october-december 2010, looking across the Bosporus onto the city, it was moved to Eminönü for the spring of 2011, into the middle of the city, on the shore of the Golden Horn, next to the Galata bridge, the Spice Bazaar and the New Mosque.
The publication documents the project and presents the full length of the panorama’s text panel in a 3,5 meter printed leporello.

About author: Andreas Fogarasi (born 1977 in Vienna), studied architecture and fine arts in Vienna and Paris, lives in Vienna. His work has been exhibited widely, including Museo Tamayo, Mexico City; GfZK Museum of Contemporary Art, Leipzig, Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Zürich; Grazer Kunstverein; Mücsarnok Budapest; Kunstverein Düsseldorf; Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid; MSU, Zagreb; Georg Kargl Fine Arts, Vienna; Lombard-Freid Projects, New York; Ludwig Forum, Aachen; Palais de Toyko, Paris and at the 52nd Biennale di Venezia 2007, where he was awarded the Golden Lion for best national participation. In his works, Fogarasi uses forms of display that are reminiscent of minimalism and conceptual art to explore questions of space and representation. Located between documentary and sculptural practice he critically ana- lyses the aestheticization and economization of urban space and the role of architecture and culture in con- temporary society. Incorporating video, sculpture and installation in wide-sweeping discursive webs, Fogarasi deals with fault lines in historiography, imagineering and cultural identities. Solo exhibitions (selection): GfzK. Museum of Contemporary Art, Leipzig; Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Zurich (2014); Galerie Cortex Athletico, Paris (2013); Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art, Toronto; Trafó, Budapest (2012); Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid; CAAC, Sevilla (2011); Ludwig Forum, Aachen; Georg Kargl Fine Arts, Vienna (2010); MAK, Vienna; Ernst Museum, Budapest; Lombard Freid- Projects, New York (2008). Group exhibitions (selection): Museo Tamayo, Mexico City; New Museum, New York (2014), Grazer Kunstverein, Graz; CAC, Vilni- us (2011); MSU, Zagreb; Mücsarnok, Budapest (2010); 52th Biennale di Venezia; Kunstverein für die Rhein- lande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf; European Kunsthalle, Cologne (2007); MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Los Angeles (2006); Palais de Toyko, Paris (2003); Manifesta 4, Frankfurt / Main (2002).

€12.00

 

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Gagarin #31. Wilfried Huet (Ed.). GAGA vzw

Posted in art, distribution, magazines, writing on January 29th, 2016
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GAGARIN
31 / 2015

with original texts by
Christina Iglesias
Shreyas Karle
Peter Buggenhout
Nikolaus Gansterer
Diego Tonus
Olafur Eliasson
Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook
Ben Kinmont

€17.00

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DNA Semantics. Gregor Mobius (ed.)

Posted in books, distribution, drawing, writing on January 23rd, 2016
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The “DNA Semantics” is a book about an interpretation of DNA/RNA as visual structures with specific formal properties and relationships. Instead of existing alphabet representation U, C, A, G and T, all the
bases are expressed as five discrete values of the gray-scale: T=white, G= light gray, A= gray, C= dark gray and U= black. Arranged in 3×4 matrices DNA strands as linear structures consisting of alphabet letters are converted in 2D images with distinct visual properties. In this representation we could learn more about DNA/RNA, not only as biological(functional) structures but also as a specific language that
can be expressed visually.

First edition. 2015

Gregor Mobius is a theoretician of languages that are expressed visually. His early work was in the field of Graph Theory developing an algorithm for visual representation of all planar and regular graphs. As a Fulbright scholar he received master of Science in Visual Studies at MIT with the paper “Discrete Visual Structure – Elements of Visual Grammar” (1984). A few years later, based on his thesis paper, Mobius proposed a specific representation of DNA and RNA that converts linear alphabet DNA structure into a 2D image. This work was presented to the public at the exhibition Gene(sis) that traveled through some West Coast universities: Washington University(2002), University of California, Berkeley (2003) and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (2004). It is now for the first time presented in a comprehensive way in the book “DNA Semantics”.

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In Darkness. A Collaboration by Brothers Kevin & Kristian Henson. Hardworking, Goodlooking. The Office of Culture & Design

Posted in art, critique, graphic design, history, illustration, lifestyle, newsprint, photography, printmaking, writing on December 23rd, 2015
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An Archive of International crust punk music, Filipino anarchist zines, Black and white punk aesthetics, anti-system philosophies, A descent into illness, a discourse on recovery

Published by Hardworking, Goodlooking

€78.00

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Artist Jokes / Abusive Names for Artists / WHAT TO DO. Ingeborg Scheffers. BASBOEK Publishers

Posted in writing on December 12th, 2015
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Artist Jokes / Kunstenaarsmoppen

A fluorescent yellow book in two languages, Dutch and English, with 34 terrible jokes about artists. For example: ‘What do all great artists have in common? They’re all dead.’ The book design is by Ingeborg Scheffers.

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Abusive Names for Artists / Het Scheldwoordenboek voor

Many Dutch find artists irritating. They seem to live off of welfare, do whatever they like, and can even, sometimes, get rich in the process! As a result, there are as many abusive nicknames for artists as there are artistic forms of expression. From this endless landscape, here is a small selection. The book is based on the collection ‘swear words for artists’ from Dutch artist PJ Roggeband.

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WHAT TO DO / WAT TE DOEN

When I tell people that I am an artist with a part-time job, they often give me unsolicited advice on how to make money with art. For years I collected these quotes and eventually made the book WHAT TO DO/WAT TE DOEN. Page 23: ‘Make contact with gay people. They don’t have children, lots of money and a refined taste.’ The book design is by Ingeborg Scheffers. Winner of the Sheffield International Artist Book Prize 2013 and the Fundacio Banc Sabadell, Arts Libris, Barcelona 2014.

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Mousse #51. Edoardo Bonaspetti (Ed.)

Posted in art, distribution, magazines, writing on December 11th, 2015
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Mousse 51 is a photo issue dedicated to exhibitions from 1985 to 1995, the last ten years or so before exhibitions went online, and possibly, before the exhibition view became a requisite genre.

Up to twenty years ago, galleries and museum, art magazines and schools had no websites; viewing a show would mean, quite simply, visiting it. A great number of seminal shows—from small but consequential artists’ debuts in private galleries, to the innovative biennial iterations in new territories and continents, to thematic and now historicized institutional exhibitions—were richly studied, avidly discussed, but poorly photographed, if at all.

This issue is an album of recommendations, for which we are very grateful to all the writers, artists, curators, dealers, and friends who accepted to share with us their favorite shows. We couldn’t find pictures for all of them, but many are here.
Thank you!

Includes:

- The Artist as Curator, issue #10

 

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Jonas Mekas: Scrapbook of the Sixties: Writings 1954 – 2010. Anne König (ed.). Spector Books

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, distribution, film, history, literature, poetry, writing on December 10th, 2015
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Scrapbook of the Sixties is a collection of published and unpublished texts by Jonas Mekas, filmmaker, writer, poet, and cofounder of the Anthology Film Archives in New York. Born in Lithuania, he came to Brooklyn via Germany in 1949 and began shooting his first films there. Mekas developed a form of film diary in which he recorded moments of his daily life. He became the barometer of the New York art scene and a pioneer of American avant-garde cinema. Every week, starting in 1958, he published his legendary “Movie Journal” column in The Village Voice, writing on a range of subjects that were by no means restricted to the world of film. He conducted numerous interviews with artists like Andy Warhol, Susan Sontag, John Lennon & Yoko Ono, Erick Hawkins, and Nam June Paik. Some of these will now appear for the first time in his Scrapbook of the Sixties. Mekas’s writings reveal him as a thoughtful diarist and an unparalleled chronicler of the times—a practice that he has continued now for over fifty years.

Jonas Mekas (*1922, Semeniškiai / Lithuania), lives and works in New York. Film-maker, writer, poet and co-founder of the Anthology Film Archives one of the world’s largest and most important repositories of avant-garde film. Mekas’s work has been exhibited in museums and festivals worldwide.

92 black-white images, adhesive bound softcover

Designed by Fabian Bremer and Pascal Storz

 

€28.00

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E.R.O.S. Issue 7: The Interior

Posted in art, distribution, literature, magazines, writing on December 1st, 2015
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E.R.O.S. Issue 7 – The Interior

Richard Wentworth | Ross Exo Adams | Carlo Mollino & Becky Beasley | Francis Haselden | Pier Vittorio Aureli | Mark Cousins | Adam Jasper | Joanna Walsh | Marlene Haring | Jamie Sutcliffe | Gillian Wylde | Melanie Bonajo | J.A. Harrington | Jeanne Randolph | Alessandra Spranzi | Timothy Brittain-Catlin | Associates (Sami Jalili & Emma Letizia Jones) | Nathalie Du Pasquier | Horrible Gif. | Charles Rice | Daniella Valz-Gen | Emma Talbot | Forbes Morlock | Natasha Soobramanien & Luke Williams | Jessie Makinson | Claudia Dutson | A. Jones | Kim Schoen | Ivonne Santoyo Orozco | Hannah Gregory | Christopher Alexander | Nemanja Zimonjic | Gabor Gyory | Jonathan Meades | Neil Chapman | Jaspar Joseph-Lester | Jacob Dreyer

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Today We Should Be Thinking About: Jo Baer, Thomas Baylre, Jimmie Durham, Robert Filliou, Haim Steinbach, and Rosemarie Trockel. Anthony Huberman (Ed.). Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König.

Posted in books, writing on November 30th, 2015
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Today We Should Be Thinking About: Jo Baer, Thomas Baylre, Jimmie Durham, Robert Filliou, Haim Steinbach, and Rosemarie Trockel. Anthony Huberman (Ed.). Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König.

The Artist´s Institute dedicates each six-month season to a single artist, whose work becomes the occasion for a series of exhibitions, public programs, and graduate seminars with leading contemporary thinkers in the fields of art, music, film, literature, science, art history, philosophy, and other creative pursuits. The first six seasons, taking place between 2010 and 2013, were dedicated to Robert Filliou, Jo Baer, Jimmie Durham, Rosemarie Trockel, Haim Steinbach, and Thomas Bayrle. In each context, the Institute convened private and public forums to reflect on each artist by reading relevant texts, displaying artworks, and programming related events, all of which are narrated in this book.

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The Exhibitionist #11. Jens Hoffman (Ed.). The Exhibitionist

Posted in art, critique, distribution, magazines, writing on October 23rd, 2015
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Overture
Jens Hoffmann, Julian Myers-Szupinska, and Liz Glass
A peculiarity of the current field of curating is an ongoing contestation over the very meaning of “to curate.” As Alice said in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, “The question is whether you can make words mean so many different things.” Humpty Dumpty answers, “The question is which [meaning] is to be master—that’s all.”

On the cover of this issue is Thomas Ruff’s 1989 portrait of a young Hans Ulrich Obrist. If this fresh-faced guy has done more than most to consolidate the identity of the curator—as a ubiquitous, cosmopolitan character, tirelessly promoting him- or herself, an exhibitionist of the global age—he has also presided over that identity’s confusion and multiplication. Is the curator, as Obrist often describes the role, a catalyst? Or is she, to quote Obrist’s frequent collaborator Suzanne Pagé, a modest commis de l’artiste, an “artist’s clerk”?

Curating has become a global concern, yet many languages still even lack a steady term for it. Meanwhile, in some circles, “curation” has a gained a buzzword-ish currency, signaling taste and discrimination across a dizzying array of cultural activities, from so-called “data curation” to creating playlists and dinner menus. The hope, it seems, is that a renewed connoisseurship might discern value amid the profusions of a global market—separate the wheat from the cultural chaff—even if it means, too, that Kanye West now has as much claim on the term “curator” as Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev or Okwui Enwezor. The more we stretch the word, it seems, the easier it becomes to hijack. It is time for some clarity.

In Attitude, João Ribas meditates on this semantic drift of the word “curating” into marketing, where it is proposed as a cure-all for digital excess and consumer glut. Following John Searle, who warns that the terms we use control the field of meaning, Ribas argues that contemporary curators must battle to retain the understanding that “curating” has held historically in the field of art, beyond connoisseurship and mere selection. He emphasizes in particular the spatial and temporal character of exhibitions, which may still offer the possibility of resisting the behavioral paradigms inflicted by capitalist urbanism and digital technology.

Geopolitical space is a central concern for several essays in this issue. In Back in the Day, Clémentine Deliss contends with the Museum of Modern Art’s notorious 1984 exhibition “Primitivism” in 20th Century Art: Affinities of the Tribal and the Modern, which “remains bedeviled by criticisms and emotional refutations that are hard to dissolve.” Comparing that exhibition’s model of “formal affinity” to a recent exhibition by the Senegalese artist and curator El Hadji Sy, she argues for exhibitionary methods that might “effect a remediating affirmation” of ethnographic objects in order to recover something of their “conceptual code.” Missing in Action republishes passages from Rasheed Araeen’s introduction to his 1989 exhibition of British Afro-Asian artists, The Other Story. By assembling the fragments of their collective story, Araeen dismantles the chauvinism of a “master art history” that had excluded non-Western contemporary artists.

In Assessments, Claire Bishop, Cristina Freire, Tobi Maier, and Octavio Zaya address the exhibition Histórias Mestiças (Mestizo Histories), a trenchant critique of Brazil’s racial democracy curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Lilia Moritz Schwarcz at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake in São Paulo. The writers find consonance around one remarkable installation that juxtaposed photographs of indigenous people by Claudia Andujar, 18th-century watercolors of the “discovery” of Brazil by Joaquim José de Miranda, and drawings from the 1970s by Taniki Manippi-theri, a Yanomami shaman. Says Bishop, “Such an anthropological gaze can diminish the present-ism of contemporary art and allow it to become a method or system of thinking. Would that more curators, in more countries, had the nerve to investigate so unflinchingly cherished national myths.” Curators’ Favorites asks contributors to elaborate on an exhibition that has inspired their thinking. Guy Brett describes a 1979 installation by the Brazilian conceptual artist Cildo Meireles, an allegory aimed at the military dictatorship in power at the time. Natasha Ginwala contends with The One Year Drawing Project, an experimental exchange of artworks across Sri Lanka meditating on the traumas of that nation’s civil war. And Vincent Honoré considers the Musée d’art moderne et contemporain in Geneva, claiming the museum itself as a “constant, ever-changing exhibition.”

Six x Six challenges curators to name the exhibitions that have mattered most to them. In this issue, Ionit Behar, Astria Suparak, Inti Guerrero, Gianni Jetzer, Sarah Demeuse, and Nikola Dietrich assemble their miniature pantheons. In Rigorous Research, the scholar Vittoria Martini deliberates the little-discussed 1970 Venice Biennale, a turning point for that venerable institution. In the gap opened by a political stalemate, the staff assumed control, and embraced experimentation and research. Research and reflection also connect the two essays in Rear Mirror. Ruba Katrib details the thinking behind her exhibition Puddle, pothole, portal, co-curated with the artist Camille Henrot at SculptureCenter, New York, describing their attempt to capture something of the weird, rambunctious spatiality of early Disney animations. Scott Rothkopf evinces, in turn, the extraordinary spatial and conceptual deliberation behind his recent Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Across this issue, then, the specificity of curatorial labor emerges—the thought needed to build aggregate meaning from disparate things in space. The word “curating” is not infinitely plastic. This, for us, is what it means. We all know how Humpy Dumpty ended up.

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