Cura. #21. Ilaria Marotta and Andrea Baccin (Ed.).

Posted in art, distribution, magazines on March 29th, 2016
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CURA. No. 21
Cover by Zoe Williams, INSIDE THE COVER
 Zoe Williams. Bodily Landscapes by Florencia Chernajovsky, PORTRAITS IN THE EXHIBITION SPACE, The Curator as Muse: Kynaston McShine, the Artist and the Museum by Lorenzo Benedetti, EXHIBITION LITERATURE: The Exhibition as Poem by Jean-Max Colard, POP-UP SECTION: DISPLAY ISSUE 02, Haim Steinbach. A Grammar of Nonsense by Frances Loeffler, ARTIST’S PROJECT: Mystical Substitution by Slavs and Tatars, ABOUT
Andra Ursuta by Myriam Ben Salah, ARTIST’S PROJECT by Puppies Puppies, SPOTLIGHT: A Transcribed Conversation between
Simon Denny and Hans Ulrich Obrist, ABOUT: Cecile B. Evans by Martha Kirszenbaum, A VISIT TO: Emily Roysdon. Comedy of Margin, Theatre, Secession, Vienna with Joao Mourao & Luis Silva, ABOUT: Charlie Billingham by James Cahill, ABOUT: Mira Dancy by Sam Korman, HOT! Andrea Crespo by Kari Rittenbach, Dora Budor by Noah Barker, Emily Mae Smith by Laura Phipps & Elisabeth Sherman, Melanie Matranga by Deborah Laks

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The Exhibitionist #11. Jens Hoffman (Ed.). The Exhibitionist

Posted in art, critique, distribution, magazines, writing on October 23rd, 2015
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Overture
Jens Hoffmann, Julian Myers-Szupinska, and Liz Glass
A peculiarity of the current field of curating is an ongoing contestation over the very meaning of “to curate.” As Alice said in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, “The question is whether you can make words mean so many different things.” Humpty Dumpty answers, “The question is which [meaning] is to be master—that’s all.”

On the cover of this issue is Thomas Ruff’s 1989 portrait of a young Hans Ulrich Obrist. If this fresh-faced guy has done more than most to consolidate the identity of the curator—as a ubiquitous, cosmopolitan character, tirelessly promoting him- or herself, an exhibitionist of the global age—he has also presided over that identity’s confusion and multiplication. Is the curator, as Obrist often describes the role, a catalyst? Or is she, to quote Obrist’s frequent collaborator Suzanne Pagé, a modest commis de l’artiste, an “artist’s clerk”?

Curating has become a global concern, yet many languages still even lack a steady term for it. Meanwhile, in some circles, “curation” has a gained a buzzword-ish currency, signaling taste and discrimination across a dizzying array of cultural activities, from so-called “data curation” to creating playlists and dinner menus. The hope, it seems, is that a renewed connoisseurship might discern value amid the profusions of a global market—separate the wheat from the cultural chaff—even if it means, too, that Kanye West now has as much claim on the term “curator” as Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev or Okwui Enwezor. The more we stretch the word, it seems, the easier it becomes to hijack. It is time for some clarity.

In Attitude, João Ribas meditates on this semantic drift of the word “curating” into marketing, where it is proposed as a cure-all for digital excess and consumer glut. Following John Searle, who warns that the terms we use control the field of meaning, Ribas argues that contemporary curators must battle to retain the understanding that “curating” has held historically in the field of art, beyond connoisseurship and mere selection. He emphasizes in particular the spatial and temporal character of exhibitions, which may still offer the possibility of resisting the behavioral paradigms inflicted by capitalist urbanism and digital technology.

Geopolitical space is a central concern for several essays in this issue. In Back in the Day, Clémentine Deliss contends with the Museum of Modern Art’s notorious 1984 exhibition “Primitivism” in 20th Century Art: Affinities of the Tribal and the Modern, which “remains bedeviled by criticisms and emotional refutations that are hard to dissolve.” Comparing that exhibition’s model of “formal affinity” to a recent exhibition by the Senegalese artist and curator El Hadji Sy, she argues for exhibitionary methods that might “effect a remediating affirmation” of ethnographic objects in order to recover something of their “conceptual code.” Missing in Action republishes passages from Rasheed Araeen’s introduction to his 1989 exhibition of British Afro-Asian artists, The Other Story. By assembling the fragments of their collective story, Araeen dismantles the chauvinism of a “master art history” that had excluded non-Western contemporary artists.

In Assessments, Claire Bishop, Cristina Freire, Tobi Maier, and Octavio Zaya address the exhibition Histórias Mestiças (Mestizo Histories), a trenchant critique of Brazil’s racial democracy curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Lilia Moritz Schwarcz at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake in São Paulo. The writers find consonance around one remarkable installation that juxtaposed photographs of indigenous people by Claudia Andujar, 18th-century watercolors of the “discovery” of Brazil by Joaquim José de Miranda, and drawings from the 1970s by Taniki Manippi-theri, a Yanomami shaman. Says Bishop, “Such an anthropological gaze can diminish the present-ism of contemporary art and allow it to become a method or system of thinking. Would that more curators, in more countries, had the nerve to investigate so unflinchingly cherished national myths.” Curators’ Favorites asks contributors to elaborate on an exhibition that has inspired their thinking. Guy Brett describes a 1979 installation by the Brazilian conceptual artist Cildo Meireles, an allegory aimed at the military dictatorship in power at the time. Natasha Ginwala contends with The One Year Drawing Project, an experimental exchange of artworks across Sri Lanka meditating on the traumas of that nation’s civil war. And Vincent Honoré considers the Musée d’art moderne et contemporain in Geneva, claiming the museum itself as a “constant, ever-changing exhibition.”

Six x Six challenges curators to name the exhibitions that have mattered most to them. In this issue, Ionit Behar, Astria Suparak, Inti Guerrero, Gianni Jetzer, Sarah Demeuse, and Nikola Dietrich assemble their miniature pantheons. In Rigorous Research, the scholar Vittoria Martini deliberates the little-discussed 1970 Venice Biennale, a turning point for that venerable institution. In the gap opened by a political stalemate, the staff assumed control, and embraced experimentation and research. Research and reflection also connect the two essays in Rear Mirror. Ruba Katrib details the thinking behind her exhibition Puddle, pothole, portal, co-curated with the artist Camille Henrot at SculptureCenter, New York, describing their attempt to capture something of the weird, rambunctious spatiality of early Disney animations. Scott Rothkopf evinces, in turn, the extraordinary spatial and conceptual deliberation behind his recent Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Across this issue, then, the specificity of curatorial labor emerges—the thought needed to build aggregate meaning from disparate things in space. The word “curating” is not infinitely plastic. This, for us, is what it means. We all know how Humpy Dumpty ended up.

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CURA #20. Ilaria Marotta and Andrea Baccin (Eds.)

Posted in art, distribution, magazines on October 16th, 2015
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CURA. No.20

FALL 2015
Cover by Allison Katz

INSIDE THE COVER Allison Katz. Pungent Painting text by Ruba Katrib – PORTRAITS IN THE EXHIBITION SPACE Wim Beeren and Tomorrow’s Museum by Lorenzo Benedetti – TALKING ABOUT Why Poetry? by Jean-Max Colard – POP-UP SECTION: DISPLAY ISSUE 01 You Display, I Display, We Display by Céline Condorelli and Gavin Wade – ABOUT Josh Kline by Ciara Moloney – PROJECT A Wonderful World Under Construction by GCC – SPOTLIGHT Ryan Gander in conversation with Adam Carr – ABOUT Michael E. Smith by Jenny Jaskey – A VISIT TO Pedro Barateiro: The Current Situation / Palmeiras Bravas, Museu Colecão Berardo, Lisboa with João Mourão & Luís Silva – ABOUT Marguerite Humeau by Hans Ulrich Obrist – HOT! – Olga Balema by Chris Sharp – Darja Bajagić by Franklin Melendez – Sascha Braunig by Rose Bouthillier – Rachel Rose by Frances Loeffler – PROJECT Villa Design Group 
and Nicoletta Lambertucci – PROJECT Lena Henke and Anna Gritz

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Modern Matter Magazine. Issue 3

Posted in architecture, art, distribution, fashion, lifestyle, photography on January 7th, 2013
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In this issue: A 60 page diary of the Venice Architecture Biennale by Juergen Teller, an interview and visual essay with Luc Tuymans, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Asad Raza on art, Andy Murray & the U.S. Open, an interview with ARS’ Gerfried Stocker, an essay by Joe Fyfe, menswear from Jil Sander, Issey Miyake, Louis Vuitton and Dries Van Noten.

Editor: Olu Michael Odukoya
Language: English
Pages: 189
Size: 27.5 x 21 cm
Binding: Softcover

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Mousse #28

Posted in art, critique, exhibitions, magazines, Motto Berlin store, writing on April 18th, 2011
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Mousse Magazine #28

In This Issue:
Kathryn Andrews, Art & the Web, Manon de Boer, Tony Conrad, France Fiction, Rob Johannesma, K8 Hardy, Tobias Kaspar, Morag Keil, Sung Hwan Kim, Letter to a Blind Man, Helen Marten, John Miller, Mike Nelson, James Richards, Ben Rivers, Eva Rothschild, Thomas Schütte, Gabriel Sierra, Javier Téllez, Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating IV , Fredrik Vaerslev, Gernot Wieland

Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating: Why Mediate Art?
by Maria Lind / edited by Jens Hoffmann / artwork by Marysia Lewandowska

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Mousse #27

Posted in art, critique, design, exhibitions, magazines, Motto Berlin store, music, photography, writing on February 9th, 2011
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Mousse Magazine no. 27

In December, Ute Meta Bauer and Dan Graham met up in New York for a conversation whose scope was determined by their many shared interests and long friendship, as well as a passion for literature that, inevitably, is connected to an extraordinary storytelling ability. Hans Ulrich Obrist and Stuart Comer got together with William (Bill) Leavitt for a long conversation just a few months after his first retrospective at Los Angeles MOCA, an event that John Baldessari celebrates in his introductory portrait of the artist.

For PART OF THE PROCESS, Ronald Van de Sompel talked with Sven Augustijnen about the artist’s new film, Spectres, which focuses on the decolonization of the Belgian Congo, especially the circumstances surrounding the murder of Patrice Lumumba. A dark work that tracks the phantoms of history into their most hidden retreats.You need to read Chus Martínez’s text at samba rhythm. Samba is a movement of the body that reverberates in the movement of the social body. It is also a way to neutralize the system, as the author explains. The art world is flooded with printed matter. Dieter Roelstraete analyzes this phenomenon for PORTFOLIO in relation to the work of Zin Taylor, who is unquestionably an exquisite narrator. To Andrew Berardini, the greatest achievement of Brian Bress’s work is that it makes us keenly aware of how much television entertainment has shaped our mental processes. Yarn Man and his bizarre friends make this clear to us.Building houses out of nothing and against all odds. Abraham Cruzvillegas has translated the experience of autoconstruccion into several initiatives, which he talked about with Vincenzo de Bellis. Fiete Stolte lives in a parallel reality. Not a different world from ours, but the same one according to a different model of time. One where nights are not always dark, nor days always light. Jennifer Allen tried to synchronize herself with the artist’s new calendar, for HARK!

ARTIST PROJECT: Jeremy Deller, introduced by an interview with Peter Eleey.

TEN FUNDAMENTAL QUESTIONS OF CURATING, a project curated by Jens Hoffmann, sponsored by Fiorucci Art Trust and Mousse Publishing, explores the multifaceted physiognomy of the curator. The third of ten dossiers features João Ribas answering the question “What to do with the contemporary?” plus selected illustrations by Matthew Buckingham

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