PROVENCE AW 19/20

Posted in magazines on October 25th, 2019
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PROVENCE AW 19/20

PROVENCE AW 19/20 is more than punk adjacent. We spent an afternoon at home with Pietro Mattioli, poring over portraits of club-goers he took during the last years of the 1970s at Club Hey, Zürich’s first punk and new wave nightclub. These images are juxtaposed with more recent shots of patrons at House Of Mixed Emotions, a series of club nights in Zürichs Longstreet Bar.

Punk manifests in many ways, and apolitical it is not. A study of the genre could not have been dedicated to paper without considering its intersectional nuance. In two interviews, Big Joanie, the Black-British feminist punk trio and Sissi Zoebeli of Thema Selection discuss the inevitability of activist pursuit as marginalized people in specific creative and temporal contexts. In conversation with Anne Gruber, Ulrike Ottinger waxes nostalgic on her feminist and decolonial education, as well as her seminal 1977 film, Madame X—An Absolute Ruler. The two met at Ottinger’s home on Bodensee, at the foot of the Alps.

Six postcards, conceived by Edgars Gluhovs, showing different crops of an image of the long-missing Lord Lucan have been scattered freely amongst the pages of this publication. Some things you’ve got to work for, others simply drop into your lap.

In the LITERATURE section of this punk-themed edition of PROVENCE, writer, curator, publicist, and editor, Hans-Christian Dany, offers a translated excerpt from his latest book, MA-1 Mode und Uniform, which is dedicated to the bomber jacket. “Deception and camouflage are part of the game when no one is supposed to know all too well how anyone else pays the rent”. Overleaf, in a passage from When Surface Was Depth (2002), London-based novelist Michael Bracewell reflects on the relationship between art, counter-cultures and subcultures, and their liquidation into a mainstream.

We have no less than three editorials in ART & FASHION, two of which are dedicated to a single designer. Mikael Gregorsky shoots Aganovich, avant-garde haute-couture, styled by Alessia Ansalone; Kristina Nagel takes her lens to experimental designer Lou de Bètoly’s latest collection, styled by our fashion editor Nina Hollensteiner; lastly, Nadine Fraczkowski journeys to a small village near Düsseldorf to capture Leila, a nineteen-year-old gymnastics enthusiast.

IN-HOUSE furthers our investigation into the nature of the contemporary gallery, which we pursued in the previous two issues. This time, we explore the phenomenon of in-house magazines founded by galleries and art institutions. We speak with Lionel Bovier, director of the MAMCO in Geneva, and Randy Kennedy, executive editor of Ursula, Hauser & Wirth’s new publication, to gain insight as to this recent art world industry trend.

To control which stories are and are not told is a great responsibility. Kari Rittenbach offers a view from the other side of the desk, with a distillate of her rejected pitches and unfinished articles—the stories that never reached a platform beyond the inboxes of her editors.

Following this course, we’ve included REVIEW, a section comprising contributions by artists, curators and critics who we invited to challenge the format of the contemporary exhibition review.

On a trip to Hangzhou, China, we visited Li Lin, the art collector and founder of JNBY. Meanwhile, in Beijing, curator Egija Inzule spoke to Anna Eschbach and Antoine Angerer of I: project space about their latest initiative, The Nightlife Residency, an interdisciplinary project focused on extracting the social potential of the city’s club-culture through a contemporary art practice. Further south, Wang Gongquan, proprietor of the Tsingpu Retreat offered advice as to the tricky business of balancing a public civil rights activism presence with a foray into the luxury hospitality business—what’s a man to do?

Hannes Grassegger wears flip-flops and makes notes on Bitcoin from Richard Branson’s island refuge, and over in Austria, our deputy editor Olamiju Fajemisin questions Ei Arakawa and Sarah Chow on the union of magic and concept from a medieval castle-cum-summer school atop a hill in the middle of Salzburg. Read all about it in REPORT.

PROVENCE. Biannual. Subscribe. Sorry.

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Terremoto 12 – Independencias. Dorothée Dupuis (Ed.) Terremoto, Motto Books

Posted in art, critique, curating, curatorial studies, Journals, magazines, Motto Books on July 18th, 2018
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Terremoto 12

Independencias
Independences

Dorothée Dupuis (Ed.)
Terremoto, Motto Books

Language: Spanish / English
Pages: 97
Size: 22.5 x 33.5 cm
Weight: 428 g
Binding: Softcover
ISBN: 9782940524761
Price: €10.00
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Harvard Design Magazine #45. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (Eds.). Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Posted in architecture, art, critique, design, distribution, magazines, Motto Berlin store, Theory, Wholesale, writing on April 26th, 2018

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To go “into the woods” is to enter both nightmare and wonderment, chaos and serenity. The woods are the threatening realm of wolves and witches, yet also a space of peace and introspection. They confound and illuminate, disorient and clarify, endanger and protect. The woods are where we “come to our senses,” and where we embrace our wilder selves. They are a space of complex life forms and ecological destruction; of growth and decay; of fantasy and ritual; of secrets and control; of hiding and? the hidden.

The woods are often framed as a nonurban place; an entity separate from, and opposed to, the city—even the world; an eternal refuge that can smoothly be entered and exited, gone into and back out of. But how much of our woods still remains to go into—and on what terms?

As designers, we encounter the woods as building site, as obstacle, and as resource—territory to be cleared, but also to be preserved, cultivated, tamed, or simulated. Wood itself—along with its products like lumber, wood pulp, silvichemicals, and charcoal—fuel the building industry and feed architecture. In a period of accelerated climate change, the planet’s woods are disappearing, burning up, threatening and threatened by human existence. How can we holistically address the woods and its ecosystems, and the life and life-giving power they contain?

This issue of Harvard Design Magazine treks into the woods to come to terms with its precarious status as habitat and resource, and to challenge assumptions about wood as material. We won’t be “out of the woods”—this looping conundrum—any time soon, even if the woods as we once knew it, and might still imagine it, has ceased to exist. At the intersection of wilderness, urbanization, and myth, “Into the Woods” embraces contradiction, challenges destruction, and revisits our roots, biological and architectural alike.

“Into the Woods” combines contributions by noted critics and theorists including Milica Topalovic, Lawrence Buell, T. J. Demos, Rosetta Elkin, Jack Halberstam, and Maria Tatar; practitioners Dogma, Alexander Brodsky, Dilip Da Cunha, Eelco Hooftman, and Paulo Tavares; as well as artists Tang Chang, Maria Thereza Alves, Janet Cardiff, and Bas Princen; anthropologists Anna Tsing and Eduardo Kohn; and philosopher Giorgio Agamben.

Harvard Design Magazine 45 is edited by Jennifer Sigler and Leah Whitman-Salkin, and published by the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD).

Language: English
Pages: 248
Size: 30.5 x 22 cm
Weight: 810 g
Binding: Softcover
ISBN: 725274577118
€15.00

Type Life Issue #2. Swiss Typefaces. SWTY Publishing.

Posted in graphic design, magazines, Motto Berlin store, newsprint, printmaking, typography on February 2nd, 2018
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The second issue of Type Life brings a cornucopia of visual inspiration. Swiss Typefaces presents insights into their cosmos of style, fonts, and fashion. This is the only place where you’ll find both Rihanna and Rudolf Koch, and where photos of contemporary art and streetwear are framed by engravings from the Caslon foundry. Type Life doesn’t make many words, and instead shows plenty of letterforms. Printed in six Pantone colors, it features mirrored words, slanted letters, gradients and all the other things your design prof wouldn’t approve of.

At the heart of this issue is Sang Bleu – the name both of a typeface and of a creative agency. Over the past decade, the two have built a legacy together. Shown are fonts that debuted in the Sang Bleu magazine, some of which later were released by Swiss Typefaces, and others that remained private. Custom typefaces designed for Vogue appear next to the experimental script variant SangBleu Snakes, followed by a stunning guest contribution from the Paris-based Studio Jimbo. Type Life #2 is made perfect by an introduction to the all-new SangBleu typeface and the accompanying printed book that showcases its 5 collections and 45 styles, released in October 2017.

 

 

Publisher: SWTY Publishing, 2017
Language: English
Pages: 36
Size: 23.5 x 32 cm
Binding: Softcover, loop staples
Printing: Offset, 6 Pantone colors
Printed in Switzerland

 
€ 15.00

 

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Borshch #2. Mariana Berezovska.

Posted in fashion, magazines, Motto Berlin store, music on February 1st, 2018
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The second issue of BORSHCH explores electronic music on and beyond the dance floor. BORSHCH #2 presents conversations with Volruptus, Steffi, Gudrun Gud, Rødhåd, Perc. Special editorial on Berlin Atonal 2017 considers the festival through the lens of curators’ perspectives with organisers, Varg and Nordic Flora. BBC Radiophonic Workshop encourage to experiment and listen. Loke Rahbek of Posh Isolation takes an intimate look at Copenhagen’s punk and noise scene. Species of Fishes talk about sound symbolism and disclose reissued wisdoms. BORSHCH discusses development of electronic music scene in Kyiv step by step with politics aside.

 

Publisher: Borshch Magazine
Language: English
Pages: 128
Size: 16.5 x 24 cm
Weight: 390 g
ISBN: 9772566828008

€ 15.00

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PERIOD Zine Issue #4

Posted in magazines, Motto Books, photography on November 21st, 2017
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PERIOD. is a zine by Lena Modigh hat unapologetically focuses on the contemporary female narrative by female-only contributors.

For the fourth issue of our journal, we decided to go where relatively so few women have gone before – SPACE. Space is defined as being 100 kilometres or 60 miles above the surface of the Earth, and about 550 people have been there. Of those, 57 have been women.

We thought we were going to be getting a lot of landscapes and interiors from our contributors but as you can see, the majority of these female responses were about people: inner space or the space between us maybe? And no one did outer space, the big universe, we emailed NASA, but they never got back 😉

Contributors include Martha Cooper, Kate Monro, Erna Klewall, Lena Modigh, Yasmine Ganley, Lara Minerva, Jessica Buie, Erin Sanders-McDonagh, Matilde Søes Rasmussen, Perdita Fenn & Julia Cody.

 

€12.00

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Awhām magazine Launch. Motto Berlin. 26.10.2017

Posted in events, magazines, Motto Berlin event on October 24th, 2017
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Awhām magazine launch @ Motto Berlin
Thursday 26th October 2017
6-10pm

Awhām magazine is pleased to invite you to the launch of its debut issue at Motto Berlin.

Awhām translated from arabic, means “Illusions”. Awhām is a collaboration among young and up-and-coming creative talents, across a range of mediums, drawn from the worlds of fashion, art, and politics, but not confined by their traditional boundaries.

Based in Berlin, Awhām is part photo journal and part graphic novel, with images and text presented to explore creatively different narratives associated with a particular theme or subject matter. Come around and celebrate with us!

+++Video work by Pandagunda+++

LOG 40. Anyone Corporation.

Posted in architecture, magazines on July 27th, 2017
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Spring/Summer 2017

Log 40 assembles a wide-ranging collection of thoughtful essays on some of the most urgent questions and debates in architecture today, bringing them into dialogue with those of architecture’s recent past. The legacy and current status of architectural images are considered from radically different vantages, in Brett Steele’s anecdotal discourse on Zaha Hadid’s 1983 painting The World (89 Degrees), John May’s exacting dissection of “architecture after imaging,” and Hana Gründler’s exploration of the ethical implications of drawing borderlines. The issue features commentary by two contemporary architects on contemporary buildings: V. Mitch McEwen on David Adjaye’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC, and Elisabetta Terragni on OMA’s Fondazione Prada in Milan. Other highlights include an excerpt from Noah’s Ark, the new collection of Hubert Damisch’s singular writings on architecture; a lively response by Mark Foster Gage to Michael Meredith’s recent Log essay on indifference; and a sampling of new domestic objects designed by architects.

€19.50

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Narr #22. Daniel Kissling (Ed).

Posted in distribution, magazines, Wholesale, writing on July 20th, 2017
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Featuring: Noémie Boebs, Sagal Maj Comafai, Viktor Dallmann, René Frauchiger, Jonis Hartmann, Ruth Loosli, Gorch Maltzen, Valerie-Katharina, Meyer, Jan Müller, Anna Ospelt, Rüdiger Saß, Adam Schwarz, Noemi Steuerwald, Adi Traar, Wolfgang Wurm.
Illustrations by Tobias Gutmann. Guest contributions from studio marcus kraft.

€15.00

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Terremoto 9. Dorothée Dupuis (ed). Terremoto & Motto Books.

Posted in art, distribution, magazines, Motto Books, Wholesale on July 14th, 2017
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In 1985, British movie director Terry Gilliam releases Brazil, a free adaptation of George Orwell’s novel 1984 (currently hitting again best-seller list in the USA). Borrowing its title from Ary Barroso’s song Brazil, after Gilliam allegedly heard it while scouting in a horrible small industrial town in the north of England, the movie is a fable about humanity’s alienation in contemporary bureaucratic and capitalist systems, and affirms the power of imagination, dream, and affect as potential tools of resistance and escape in a surrealistic, post-Monty Python tone.

2017: in Brazil, the repercussion of “Lava Jato Operation” now infiltrates all layers of the Brazilian upper class and beyond, and will likely force Michel Temer, Brazil’s coup-monger president, to move out of the presidential house imminently, and this time, not because of alleged ghosts. The “Brazilian Miracle” is definitely outdated, and the major non-Hispanic country of Latin America is experiencing the worst political and institutional crisis of its history. On the other hand, a national council of Mexican indigenous groups backed by the Zapatista rebels just selected Maria de Jésus Patricio Martínez, a Nahua woman, as the country’s first indigenous presidential candidate. This as Mexico is said to enter the world’s 10 largest economies in the next few years, dangerously challenging its northern neighbor, for better or for worse.

Cards are shuffling quickly in the Americas and it seems that what we once expected from the north or the south might soon not matter anymore. Could it be time to reconsider our origins, to invent a new future, to finally get rid of our displaced modern ambitions and appropriate critically the performance of the exotic that cursed us for so long? In this issue of Terremoto, we will talk about places which don’t really exist as such, identities traded for others, landscapes that imprison us or, on the contrary, set us free, trying to set our landmarks aside as we look for a path towards new forms of consilience.

With contributions by: Fernanda Brenner, Tiago Carneiro da Cunha, Hank Willis Thomas, Modou Dieng, Devon Van Houten Maldonado, Pedro de Niemeyer Cesarino, Carolina Castro Jorquera, Cecilia Vicuña, Gabriel Mejía Abad, Marilia Loureiro, Pedro Victor Brandão, PDP (Public Display of Professionalism), Maria do Carmo M. P. de Pontes, Ilê Sartuzi, Ana Vaz, Luiz Roque, Cristiano Lenhardt, Bárbara Wagner, Benjamin de Burca, Paulina Ascencio, Fabiola Torres-Alaga, Alberto García del Castillo, César Zegarra, Susana Vargas Cervantes, Veronica Stigger.

€10.00

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