Elisa Storelli and Constantin Engelmann @ Motto Berlin 15.9.2015

Posted in art, events, exhibitions on September 14th, 2015


Elisa Storelli and Constantin Engelmann @ Motto Berlin 15.9.2015
from 19.00

Time Piece (additive synthesis bell)

This installation changes the time at Motto. Its bell strikes the hours according to the sci-fi time “System Sin 1.0” (developed by the artists). In place of the regular hours in UTC time, the hours in “System Sin 1.0” are spread along a sinusoidal curve, so that their duration varies throughout the day.

In “System Sin 1.0 time”, as in ancient Rome, day and night are fixed by sunrise and sunset. Between these solar events, sin hours shorten towards noon and midnight. As the duration of daylight increases or decreases slightly every day, the duration of sin hours varies accordingly.

Motto Art Book Exhibition and Sale @ Expo Georgia. Tbilissi. 12-13.09.2015

Posted in books, events, exhibitions on September 11th, 2015
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The Book Art Center at Expo House invites you to an an exhibition/art book sale. 
Presenting independent publications from local Georgian artists and books courtesy of Motto. The selection includes experimental and independent works from artists, designers, poets, philosophers, architects and photographers made by their own efforts. The exhibition explores modern publications as a means to examine the book as a new form for expressing creative impulses and ideas.
Supported by Goethe Institute and Expo Georgia.
The Exhibition/Sale takes place at Expo House, Tsereteli ave. 118 (wooden cottage near cafe “Terrace”).
Saturday 12th – Sunday 13th September, 6pm – 10pm



Spike #45 Fall 2015, Rita Vitorelli (Ed.)

Posted in art, magazines on September 11th, 2015
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9/11. The Greek referendum. Tonight’s opening. The many events that have nothing to do with spectacle or even remain invisible. The event holds the promise of the collective encounter; it is ubiquitous and rare. When does it begin: on Facebook, when you step through the door or when the live-stream is running? Or only when something happens that can no longer be undone?


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Fillip #20, Kristina Lee Podevsa (Ed.)

Posted in art, critique, magazines, Theory, writing on September 11th, 2015
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In this Issue:

Ken Becker: Not Just Some Canadian Hippie Bullshit: The Western Front as Artists’ Practice
Nathan Crompton: Elegy of the Non-event
Zanna Gilbert: The Human Letter: Mail Art Exchanges between East Berlin and Northeast Brazil in the 1970s
Paul Branca and Jesi Khadivi: Social Networks and Soft Crimes
Lois Klassen: Arriving at Nowhere: Reflecting on Chris Kraus’s Radical Localism
Philip Monk: Battle Stances: General Idea, CEAC, and the Struggle for Ideological Dominance in Toronto, 1976–78
Melanie O’Brian: A Wicked Problem: Fogo Island Dialogues
Nina Power: Decapitalism, Left Scarcity, and the State
Mohammad Salemy, Nick Srnicek, and Alex Williams: Speed Trials: A Conversation about Accelerationist Politics
Chantal Pontbriand and Amy Zion: Parachute: 1975–2007 and Its Afterlife
Yvonne Rainer, Hand Movie


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Camera Austria #131. Reinhard Braun (Ed.)

Posted in art, magazines, photography on September 11th, 2015
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Shannon Ebner
Morgan Fisher
Jan Groover
Hans Hansen
Louis Ducos du Hauron
Judith Hopf
Horst P. Horst
Barbara Kasten
David Lieske
Dirk von Lowtzow
Maren Lübbke-Tidow
Henrik Olesen
Arthur Ou
Josephine Pryde
Sabine Reitmaier
Michael Schmidt
Hendrik Schwantes
Sylvia Sleigh
Lucie Stahl
Herbert Tobias
Christopher Williams


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Flex-O-View. S-Q-U-E-E-Z-E to Focus. Agnieszka Grodzinska. Starter Gallery

Posted in art, Artist Book, distribution, exhibition catalogue on September 9th, 2015
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Flex-O-View. S-Q-U-E-E-Z-E to Focus

by Agnieszka Grodzinska

Published by Starter Gallery



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Kirsten Palz, 100 Works. Erik Steinbrecher. rakete.co

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, distribution on September 9th, 2015
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Kirsten Palz, 100 Works (2007-2014)

Read by Erik Steinbrecher



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The heaviness of things and stuff. Lieven Lahaye‬.

Posted in Uncategorized on September 9th, 2015



Design: Ott Metusala. Advisor: Janice McNab. Amsterdam 2015


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wow! Woven? Entering the (sub)Textiles. wow! Woven? Entering the (sub)Textiles

Posted in art, books, exhibition catalogue, exhibitions, painting, sculpture on September 9th, 2015
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With “wow! Woven? Entering the (sub)Textiles,” the Künstlerhaus, Halle für Kunst & Medien is presenting an exhibition that encompasses two of the venue’s levels. It is devoted to the diverse issues related to the position of “textiles” as medium and material in the exploration of contemporary art practices in this present age teeming with networking metaphors.
From the very beginning in nearly all cultures and with usage impacting society, textiles have been veritably predestined for being charged with political content, and for use and consideration even outside of artisan contexts and the related negotiability on an artistic level. In the recent past, numerous large and comprehensive exhibitions have carried out exacting surveys on the general familiarity of the textile, on its sensory qualities, its uniquely inscribed features, and its wealth of weaving types, textures, and works developed globally over the centuries. Such projects have contributed to a renaissance and re-evaluation of textiles and emphasised their natural tendency to challenge the classically hierarchical concepts of work, image, and object. “wow! Woven? Entering the (sub) Textiles” accentuates its exhibition focus by concentrating on works that foster aspects of an artistically investigative exploration of history, including the role of the textile industry within the capitalist form of commodity production and the means of organising production methods.
Exhibition participant Rubén Grilo, for example, emphasises with a series of denim fabric works the onset of industrialisation as a turning point in our relationship with technologies. Once synonymous with a durable fabric for the working class and later symbolic of the Western individualist promise of freedom, today the visible wear and tear of jeans is designed through digital processes and implemented using laser irradiation before even hitting the market. This act allows the factors previously specific to strong work-, body-, and time-related wear to degenerate through mere simulation and thus highlights the changing body-work relations. The artist Sascha Reichstein, in turn, presents a large installative video work “The Production of Tradition” focused on the outsourced production of traditional clothing by example of lederhosen in Sri Lanka. She for instance explores the dissolution of formerly prevalent workmanship forms aligned to local conditions and the concomitant loss of traditional artisan techniques, regional distinctions, and the ability to identifying goods with specific locales.
The far-reaching history of the precarious working conditions within the textile industry, still unchanged today, and of the revolutionary potential of the textile workers in countering such abuse are thematised by
Judith Raum. Presented in the exhibition, her research project “disestablish” takes the first weavers’ uprisings in fourteenth-century northern Italy as its point of departure and shows the textile to be a carrier material of social conflicts, with the artist using banners made of textile material to make this point.
The collaboration of Ines Doujak and John Barker in the form of the longstanding and still ongoing research project “LOOMSHUTTLES/WARPATHS” likewise examines the complex relations among fabric, clothing, and colonialism starting with the early forms of global capitalism. On the evening of the exhibition opening, shirts from the artists’ Haute Couture collection accompanying the project will be presented for sale as part of their exhibition presence. The shirts themselves represent a visualization of the the tight job-order calculations at the expense of safety precautions for the sewers employed at the textile mills.
Against this content-focused backdrop of the presented works, which particularly reflects on processes of production, “wow! Woven? Entering the (sub)Textiles” compiles a further variety of selected artworks that present a reflexive spectrum of textile use ranging between tangible material, meaning-laden medium, technique, and idea. The works of art thus embody the general fragility of the material, attempt mediatic translations, and confirm their enduring fascination, including extraordinary positions by Heidi Bucher, Sheila Hicks, Helena Huneke, and Ingrid Wiener.
Curated by Christian Egger


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Happy Purim. Estelle Hanania. Shelter Press.

Posted in art, books, distribution, photography on September 8th, 2015
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September 2015 marks the release of Happy Purim, a new monograph dedicated to the work of paris-based photographer Estelle Hanania. Happy Purim gathers 42 images documenting 3 years of photographs taken between 2011 and 2014 during the Purim holiday in the neighbourhood of Stamford Hill, London.
Kids wearing home made costums incarnating a wide range of human vernacular history and reality (from the pizza to the clown). Standing in the street they are revealing some cultural fantasies as well as the familiar invisible backgrounds of their neighborhood: a simple tree, a part of a brick wall, a locked door or a pavement.

While the content of this book could appear a bit softer compare to her previous series, costums, masks, parade and most of Hanania’s recurring subject are fully vivid here. To quote french rabbi Delphine Horvilleur, who signs a text at the end of the book : « Purim has the reputation of being a holiday for children. It is children, besides, that constitute the very matter of these photos even if the truth, in my opinion, is that Purim is an adult holiday. Children, in a way, act like a veil, like the “masks” – in all senses of the word – disguising the holiday, making it up in order to hide the complex questions it raises. The fundamental issue of Purim is the question of appearance and of internal reality. On this day, we read a text called the Megillah of Esther, whose content should practically be censured for underage persons. »

Estelle Hanania lives and works in Paris. Happy Purim is her fifth collaboration with Shelter Press, following Attila Csihar, Broken Mirror & Metamorphosis of the Tree (2010), Dondoro (2011), Glacial Jubilé (2013), and more recently Eternelle Idole (2015), a collaboration with Stephen O’Malley and Gisèle Vienne published last month.


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