The First Summer Fest of Western Liberation @ Reunion. Zurich June 3 – 5, 2016.

Posted in events on May 31st, 2016

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The First Summer Fest of Western Liberation June 3 – 5, 2016

Artist Keren Cytter is returning to her former gallery location Elisabeth Kaufmann (now Réunion) and initiates together with Natalie Keppler and Andreas Wagner a summer festival for all forms of art.
The First Summer Fest of Western Liberation is formed for the non-globetrotting crowd and the young people of Zurich. The festival wants to expand the idea of contemporary art, art-space, art-event and time in general with music performances by the all-girl jazzy, post-pop-punk band Ravioli Me Away, the theatrical music performer Mathias Ringgenberg aka PRICE and Hove aka Marc Hofweber, among others.

The First Summer Fest of Western Liberation is a non-institutional art event that aims to present time-based art in a weekend of hard and light-hearted entertainment: From a curated library by Christoph Schifferli & MOTTO, to a Brunch based performance by Dafna Maimon and Hanne Lippard, among others.

The First Summer Fest of Western Liberation separates art from capital and delivers it to the general public in one weekend of relief with screenings by the talented Berlin based Kerstin Cmelka and the New York It girl Maggie Lee.

The face of the festival and host is Robert Steinberger. Location: RÉUNION, Müllerstrasse 57, Zurich
Date: June 3-5, 2016
 Daily: 2PM – 1AM

Participants: Christoph Schifferli & MOTTO, Andrew Kerton, Antonio Grulli, Keren Cytter, Ravioli Me Away, Thomas Moor, Maggie Lee, Cosima Grand, Marc Hofweber aka HOVE, Mathias Ringgenberg aka PRICE, Dafna Maimon & Hanne Lippard, Kerstin Cmelka, Sophie Jung and Pascal Sidler.

RÉUNION: combines, condenses and converts curatorial field research and experimental art production.

FULL PROGRAM

Harvard Design Magazine #42. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (eds.). Harvard

Posted in Artist magazine, magazines, Motto Berlin store, Motto Books, Uncategorized on May 30th, 2016
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Editors: Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman Salkin
Publisher: Harvard University Graduate School of Design
Pages: 208

“Run for Cover!”
No. 42
S/S 2016

Table of Contents:
Editor’s note: Dreadful Design
Jennifer Sigler
Wide Open
Nancy Etcoff
Fortress London: The New US Embassy and the Rise of Counter-Terror Urbanism
Oliver Wainwright
Feeling Invaded
John Kuo Wei Tchen
Gimme Shelter: Refugee Architecture in Germany
Niklas Maak
Phobia and the City: Rome
Lars Lerup
Holding Fear
Sonja Dümpelmann
Unsettling Unsettlements
Marianne F. Potvin
Anthropocenophobia: The Stone Falls on the City
Renata Tyszczuk
Solitary in Solidarity
Daniel D’Oca
Fear Ebbs on the Skyline but Rises on the Ground
Blair Kamin
Get Me Out of Here: The Solemn Geography of Women in Horror Film
Caryn Coleman
Reading Jane Jabobs in the Era of #BlackLivesMatter
Stuart Schrader
Un-War
Krzysztof Wodiczko
Animal Eyes & Invisible Hunters
Eugénie Shinkle
Fearful Asymmetry: Insurgency and the Architectures of Terror
Joshua Comaroff
Die Noctuque
Enrique Ramirez
A Certain Darkness
Demdike Stare & Robert Gerard Pietrusko
Who’s Afraid of the Covered Face?
Maryam Monalisa Gharavi
Artifacts of Exclusion
Interboro Partners
Fear Is in the Detail
Francesca Hughes & Gergely Kovács
The Iconic Ghetto and the Stigma of Blackness
Elijah Anderson
A Toxic Patrimony
Dan Borelli
The Green Zone: Architectures of Precarious Politics
Amin Alsaden
How to Draw Medellín
Alejandro Echeverri & Alejandro Valdivieso
Mortal Cities
Arna Mačkić
Bringing Back the Front: Relieving the Great War
Justin Fowler
Home Safe
Geoff Manaugh
The Fall of Postmodernism and the New Empowerment
Michael Murphy
Building for the Total Breakdown
Jacob Lillemose
A State of Emergency
Léopold Lambert
Conflict Urbanism, Aleppo
Laura Kurgan
Nuclear Pillowcases
Andrew Wasserman
The Real Move
Elizabeth Streb & Chelsea Spencer
Fear, Faith, and Disaster Preparedness
Arif Khan
The House of One: Facing Fear
Lara Schrijver
Pastiche of Ghosts
Metahaven
Second Nature
Ralph Ghoche
Suspunk: Thinking with Suspicious Packages
Javier Arbona, Bryan Finocki, Nick Sowers
The Horror, the Horror
Bart Lootsma
Robert Smithson, Evel Knievel, and the Landscape of Reclamation
Edward Eigen
Kites
Reginald Dwayne Betts
Feared Spaces, Feared Bodies
Toni L. Griffin
Fear, Fire, and Forty-One Snakes: Notes on the Burning Theater
Thomas A. P. Van Leeuwen
Ambiguous Thresholds
Nuttinee Karnchanaporn

15 €
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Landscape in Modern Architecture. Tamami Iinuma(ed.)

Posted in architecture, art, Artist Book, books, events, Japan, Motto Berlin store on May 30th, 2016
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Landscape in Modern Architecture.  Tamami Iinuma(ed.)

Landscape in Modern Architecture.  Tamami Iinuma(ed.). self-published 3Landscape in Modern Architecture.  Tamami Iinuma(ed.). self-published 2Landscape in Modern Architecture.  Tamami Iinuma(ed.). self-published 1Landscape in Modern Architecture.  Tamami Iinuma(ed.) 1

Landscape in Modern Architecture

The color palette-like geometric patterns in the images of the “Landscape in Modern Architecture” series were shot in the Dessau Master’s Houses, where Bauhaus masters such as Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee lived, and the Bauhaus Building, where the same masters taught courses on color theory in the early 20th Century. In this series Iinuma takes “corners of a room” as the smallest compositional unit of an urban landscape and combines snapshots with images of corners of rooms, which she shot at Bauhaus. To produce her first artist book “schwarzschild” in 2012, she confronted the approximately 100,000 photographs she had shot in the past eight years and hypothesized that the collection of room corners constitutes a building, and the street running between buildings constitute urban space, the stage of everyday events. She explains that she was concious of Japanese poetry when she selected the images based on the concept explained above. In Hyakuninisshu (100 Poems by 100 Poets), poem that share keywords such as “mountain”, “river”, or “cherry” are juxtaposed to create a grid 10 cards wide and 10 cards high. “Landscape in Modern Architecture”, which takes framed world as “keywords” and connects them to produce an expansive space in nothing less than an attempt to redefine landscape photography.

30 x 21 cm
Signed
Edition of 100
Self Published

40 €
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Zweikommasieben #13 .Remo Bitzi (ed.). Präsens Editionen & Motto Books

Posted in Artist magazine, magazines, Motto Berlin store, Motto Books on May 28th, 2016
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zweikommasieben_13_.remo_bitzi_ed._._pr_sens_editionen_motto_books_4Zweikommasieben #13 .Remo Bitzi (ed.). Präsens Editionen & Motto Books 1 Zweikommasieben #13 .Remo Bitzi (ed.). Präsens Editionen & Motto Books 2 Zweikommasieben #13 .Remo Bitzi (ed.). Präsens Editionen & Motto Books 5 Zweikommasieben #13 .Remo Bitzi (ed.). Präsens Editionen & Motto Books 9
zweikommasieben #13 deals with questions about the professional and social proximity of the featured artists (among many other things). Featured are Aïsha Devi & Tianzhuo Chen, Helm, Heatsick, Dean Blunt, Lumisokea, Thug Entrancer, Mathew Dryhurst, Nick Klein, Lane Stewart & Rabit, Butter Sessions, Don’t DJ, Felix Kubin, Phase Fatale, Lustmord, etc. Co-published with Motto Books.

Language: English/German
Edition: 1600
Pages: 176
Size: 175 x 260mm

zweikommasieben is a Swiss magazine that has been devoted to the documentation of contemporary club culture since the summer of 2011. The magazine features artist interviews, essays and columns as well as photography, illustration and graphics. In addition, zweikommasieben organizes concerts, parties, club nights, matinees, raves and other fun events in various cities.

 

12 €

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The Exhibitionist #12. Jens Hoffmann (ed.) The Exhibitionist.

Posted in art, Artist magazine, distribution, magazines, Motto Berlin store on May 25th, 2016
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The Exhibitionist #12
contents

Response I: Artists and curators

Fia Backström and Anthony Huberman Re: family dynamics

Anne Ellegood and Kerry Tribe Long Term Relationship

Claire Fontaine and Jens Hoffmann Artistic Bitches and Curatorial Bastards

Inés Katzenstein and Juan José Cambre Agreement

Response II: Archival

Introduced by Liz Glass
Dear King Harry
James Lee Byars: Correspondence with Harald Szeemann (1988)

La critique

Triple Candie: Let the Artists Die
Emiliano Valdés: Who Has the Power?
Nontobeko Ntombela: Remastered
Daniel Birnbaum: Hijacking the Situationists
Slavs and Tatars: The Splits of the Mind, If Not the Legs
Rachel Rose: Artist, Curator, Meaning
+
An Illustrated Bibliography of the exhibitionist, Issues IX–XII

8€
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Tamami Iinuma. Japan in der DDR. Opening 28.05.16 @ Motto Berlin at 6pm.

Posted in art, events, exhibitions, Japan, Motto Berlin event, Motto Berlin store, Motto Books, Uncategorized on May 24th, 2016
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There is a strikingly conspicuous high-rise building behind the Leipzig Central Station that contrasts with the city horizon. The 96 meters high tower, in a dignified shining pearl color, was first called Interhotel Merkur and is now The Westin Leipzig. With 27 floors it hosts more that 400 rooms with event and seminar spaces on separate floors, shops, restaurants. It’s a little city within the city.

In 2008, shortly after starting to study at the Academy of Visual Arts Leipzig, I learnt that it is one of the few buildings that a Japanese construction company has build in German Democratic Republic in the late 1970s (there is two other constructions to be find in Dresden and Berlin). Something around and in this building triggered me to feel at home. When I saw it, I thought of the World Trade Center in Tokyo, from the top of which I enjoyed the Summer Festival of fireworks one day before my departure to Leipzig. So at that time I started to project my personal conflicts of a stranger in a new city on this huge building which became both a symbol of my hometown (even if, to be honest, there is nothing Japanese in its architecture) and of my frustrations.

With the celebrations of the 25 year of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of GDR, I wanted to know more about this building. Until then I had just looked at it from a distance and I finally decided to enter the Interhotel Merkur after 6 years of observation. I booked a room for one night there, took my camera and opened the door.

The Four-star hotel was deserted. Its Japanese restaurant which was once the best in Leipzig had no guests. And a cleaning man said to me: « I have been working here since the opening of the hotel, it was full of business people from all over the world in the 1980s ». He also explained me that the hotel was a hotbed of “illegal” prostitution (however this prostitution took roll as the espionage). I went to the reception and asked: « I heard that this hotel was build by a Japanese company. Is that right ? » A young man answered: « never heard about that » but the next morning I found a letter in my room with that simple sentence : This hotel was built by the Kajima Corporation.

In the summer 2014 I visited the library of Kajima Corporation in Tokyo. The librarian, Ms. Oda, prepared for me archive photos of construction, company’s monthly report, and even confidential documents. She also introduced me to Mr. Shimazu who was in charge of the architectural design team and lived in Leipzig from 1978 to 1981. I got the opportunity to hear their anecdotes, like the event that happened on January 12th, 1979 when the construction office was robed and all the money (GDR-Mark) from the safe was stolen. Additionally one roll of 35mm film that was in the camera of Mr. Sako, a colleague of Mr. Shimazu, had been gone as well. The camera was still in the office, but it had been opened and the negative had vanished. What was photographed in Mr. Sako’s camera must be normally the hotel’s construction process but that disparition had something from a spy movie. They went to the police but neither cash nor the film have ever been back.

I have been photographing modern architecture in Germany since 2008 and I am continuing to shoot similar buildings depending on my trips. In the process of creation, there is always a logical decision on positioning three bodies: the architectural body, the machinal body (camera) and my own body (photographer). But with Interhotel Merkur, I was strangely so excited that I could not measure the distances between the different « actors ». This architecture has, for me, the presence of a real and existing body that contains its story and its emotion. The building has its own life (which I am probably projecting on it) and, therefore, is reluctant to my photographs. But, for the History it represents, for its architecture (between classical Plattenbau and Japanese brutalism), for its role in my personal life, I decided to give it a try, again and again, until I obtain the right portrait of that motionless character of concrete.

When I left the archive of Kajima Corporation after my third visit, the librarian said to me: « Thank you, you shed light on our work, which has been forgotten ». This made me understand the real meaning of my obsession for the Interhotel Merkur: I sensed a Japanese spirit (or a soul?) in Leipzig. And I need to follow it before it flies too far away.

*This essay was originally written by the artist, and edited by Thibaut de Ruyter, for the publication「Stadt Bild / Image of City」(Cooperation by Berlinische Galerie, Deusche Bank Kunsthalle, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Nationalgalerie-Staatlische Museen zu Berlin)

Japan in der DDR - Tamami Iinuma - Exhibition Opening 28.05.16 @ Motto Berlin at 6pm.

Archive of Kveta Fulierova / FAMILY. Petra Feriancova (ed). Sputnik Editions

Posted in art, books, Motto Berlin store, Motto Books, photography on May 23rd, 2016
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Archive of Kveta Fulierova : FAMILY , Petra Feriancova , Sputnik Editions 1Archive of Kveta Fulierova : FAMILY , Petra Feriancova , Sputnik Editions 5 Archive of Kveta Fulierova : FAMILY , Petra Feriancova , Sputnik Editions 3 Archive of Kveta Fulierova : FAMILY , Petra Feriancova , Sputnik Editions 2 Archive of Kveta Fulierova : FAMILY , Petra Feriancova , Sputnik Editions

This book is an attempt at grasping an important part of Květa Fulierová’s archive, which holds a selection of negatives and printed black and white photographs stowed away in envelopes, marked according to themes and sorted chronologically in chocolate boxes. These photographs pertain to the everyday of a family; of her shared household with Július Koller from the period starting in the eighties, when Květa’s grandsons were born, and ending in their adulthood and the passing away of Július Koller in 2007.

25 €

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Negative Space: Orbiting Inner and Outer Experience (no.2). Antonia Hirsch (ed.). SFU Galleries

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, distribution, exhibitions on May 19th, 2016
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Antonia Hirsch (ed.) in conversations with and reproduced texts by Theodor Adorno, Lorna Brown, Daniel Colucciello Barber, Elena Filipovic, François Laruelle, Olaf Nicolai, Lisa Robertson, Ana Teixeira Pinto, and Wolfgang Winkler.

Expanding from the exhibition Negative Space, this lateral publication of seven conversations and reprinted texts is a project in its own right to consider the space between and around subjects and objects.

Antonia Hirsch’s practice testifies to a long-standing engagement with the quantitative, spatial and syntactic systems that structure an understanding of our universe. The opposite of chaos, cosmos can be defined as a complex and organized system: the ordered universe. Hirsch’s work often relates these ordering structures to embodied and visual experience, considering how the equivocal and often ideological nature of these representational systems is expressed through a level of abstraction.

12 €

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Slikar Painter ’73. Žiga Kariž. Institute for Contemporary Art, Ljubljana.

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, distribution on May 18th, 2016
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The Catalogue at hand is the result of collaboration between three institutions: The Museum and Galleries of Ljubljana, Aksioma – Institute for Contemporary Art and the Nova Gorica Arts Centre, and is published in parallel with the exhibition of Kariž’s latest works at the Cultural centre Tobacna 001, which will be partly translated to the Nova Gorica City Gallery at the beginning of 2016.

20€
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Piles of Books: Art as Publishing in the 20th and 21st Centuries. A Talk by David Senior. 26.05.16, 7pm @ Wendy’s Subway, Brooklyn

Posted in events on May 17th, 2016
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David Senior, Bibliographer at the Museum of Modern Art Library in New York, will discuss a history of artists’ publications in the 20th and 21st centuries. Senior presents examples of how artists and designers have used little publications as experimental containers for new ideas, creating lively and accessible spaces to communicate work and archive art actions. Most examples will come from the collection of books that he works with at the MoMA Library and several recent library exhibitions he has organized of artists’ books and ephemera.

This event is presented by Wendy’s Subway and Motto Books, Berlin, on the occasion of the Motto Books temporary bookstore, open weekends from 12pm to 6pm, May 1st through May 29th.

David Senior is the bibliographer at the Museum of Modern Art Library, where he manages collection development, including the library’s artists’ books collection. Senior lectures often on the history of artists’ publications and contemporary art and design publishing. He also curates exhibitions of MoMA Library materials including: THE ELECTRO-LIBRARY (2016), Ray Johnson Designs (2014), Please Come to the Show (2013), Millennium Magazines (2012), Access to Tools: Publications from the Whole Earth Catalog, 1968–74 (2011). Please Come to the Show, a book documenting his exhibition of artists’ invitations and show flyers from the MoMA Library, was published by Occasional Papers in 2014. His writing has appeared in Frieze, Dot Dot Dot, Bulletins of the Serving Library, ART PAPERS, and C Magazine. He organizes a regular program of events for Printed Matter’s New York Art Book Fair and the LA Art Book Fair called the Classroom. Senior edited an artist’s book series through Printed Matter and the NYABF from 2008-2014, which included publications with Dexter Sinister, David Horvitz, Emily Roysdon, Aaron Flint Jamison, James Hoff and Eve Fowler. He serves on the board of directors of Primary Information and Yale Union.