foundprints books 002 (set). Soichi Suzuki

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, Japan on November 3rd, 2015
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A set of four leporellos by Soichi Suzuki

10 x 8 x 3.8 cm



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Rob Pruitt’s eBay Flea Market: Year 1. Tommaso Speretta (ed.). Bruno

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, distribution on October 27th, 2015
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This book is an unconventional autobiography. It retraces one year in the life of Rob Pruitt through the quotidian objects that the artist once loved, consumed, then felt he didn’t need anymore. An extension of the real-world flea markets, that he has been organizing since the early 1990′s, this particular collection of belongings sold on eBay from September 23 2013- September 23 2014 unearths precious fragments of Pruitt’s life while revealing his most material desires.


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Silvia Prada. GENERATION X. Triangle Books

Posted in distribution, drawing on October 23rd, 2015
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A series of portraits of teen idols of the 80′s and early 90′s in Silvia Prada’s classic monochromatic nostalgia-meets pop art manifestos. Prada playfully chronicles cultural iconography with the ardent reverence of a teen fan mixed with the obsession to detail of an anthropologist and the refined hand of an expressive illustrator. Generation X’s celebration of this golden age is a fantastical glimpse into our past and an early grappling with stardom and popular culture long before the digital era.

This publication is the fourth in a series of artist books dedicated to b/w portraits.

Published by Triangle Books. Brussels

€ 18.00

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Posted in art, distribution, photography on October 23rd, 2015
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Clearly indebted to Andy Warhol’s ironic identity play in his photobooth self portraits, these photographs were shot for the series The Exquisite Self Portraits, 2010, in which Rob Pruitt collaged onto large canvases three or four horizontal bands featuring photo fragments of his head and chest.

This publication is the fifth in a series of artist books dedicated to b/w portraits.


€ 18.00

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The Exhibitionist #11. Jens Hoffman (Ed.). The Exhibitionist

Posted in art, critique, distribution, magazines, writing on October 23rd, 2015
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Jens Hoffmann, Julian Myers-Szupinska, and Liz Glass
A peculiarity of the current field of curating is an ongoing contestation over the very meaning of “to curate.” As Alice said in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, “The question is whether you can make words mean so many different things.” Humpty Dumpty answers, “The question is which [meaning] is to be master—that’s all.”

On the cover of this issue is Thomas Ruff’s 1989 portrait of a young Hans Ulrich Obrist. If this fresh-faced guy has done more than most to consolidate the identity of the curator—as a ubiquitous, cosmopolitan character, tirelessly promoting him- or herself, an exhibitionist of the global age—he has also presided over that identity’s confusion and multiplication. Is the curator, as Obrist often describes the role, a catalyst? Or is she, to quote Obrist’s frequent collaborator Suzanne Pagé, a modest commis de l’artiste, an “artist’s clerk”?

Curating has become a global concern, yet many languages still even lack a steady term for it. Meanwhile, in some circles, “curation” has a gained a buzzword-ish currency, signaling taste and discrimination across a dizzying array of cultural activities, from so-called “data curation” to creating playlists and dinner menus. The hope, it seems, is that a renewed connoisseurship might discern value amid the profusions of a global market—separate the wheat from the cultural chaff—even if it means, too, that Kanye West now has as much claim on the term “curator” as Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev or Okwui Enwezor. The more we stretch the word, it seems, the easier it becomes to hijack. It is time for some clarity.

In Attitude, João Ribas meditates on this semantic drift of the word “curating” into marketing, where it is proposed as a cure-all for digital excess and consumer glut. Following John Searle, who warns that the terms we use control the field of meaning, Ribas argues that contemporary curators must battle to retain the understanding that “curating” has held historically in the field of art, beyond connoisseurship and mere selection. He emphasizes in particular the spatial and temporal character of exhibitions, which may still offer the possibility of resisting the behavioral paradigms inflicted by capitalist urbanism and digital technology.

Geopolitical space is a central concern for several essays in this issue. In Back in the Day, Clémentine Deliss contends with the Museum of Modern Art’s notorious 1984 exhibition “Primitivism” in 20th Century Art: Affinities of the Tribal and the Modern, which “remains bedeviled by criticisms and emotional refutations that are hard to dissolve.” Comparing that exhibition’s model of “formal affinity” to a recent exhibition by the Senegalese artist and curator El Hadji Sy, she argues for exhibitionary methods that might “effect a remediating affirmation” of ethnographic objects in order to recover something of their “conceptual code.” Missing in Action republishes passages from Rasheed Araeen’s introduction to his 1989 exhibition of British Afro-Asian artists, The Other Story. By assembling the fragments of their collective story, Araeen dismantles the chauvinism of a “master art history” that had excluded non-Western contemporary artists.

In Assessments, Claire Bishop, Cristina Freire, Tobi Maier, and Octavio Zaya address the exhibition Histórias Mestiças (Mestizo Histories), a trenchant critique of Brazil’s racial democracy curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Lilia Moritz Schwarcz at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake in São Paulo. The writers find consonance around one remarkable installation that juxtaposed photographs of indigenous people by Claudia Andujar, 18th-century watercolors of the “discovery” of Brazil by Joaquim José de Miranda, and drawings from the 1970s by Taniki Manippi-theri, a Yanomami shaman. Says Bishop, “Such an anthropological gaze can diminish the present-ism of contemporary art and allow it to become a method or system of thinking. Would that more curators, in more countries, had the nerve to investigate so unflinchingly cherished national myths.” Curators’ Favorites asks contributors to elaborate on an exhibition that has inspired their thinking. Guy Brett describes a 1979 installation by the Brazilian conceptual artist Cildo Meireles, an allegory aimed at the military dictatorship in power at the time. Natasha Ginwala contends with The One Year Drawing Project, an experimental exchange of artworks across Sri Lanka meditating on the traumas of that nation’s civil war. And Vincent Honoré considers the Musée d’art moderne et contemporain in Geneva, claiming the museum itself as a “constant, ever-changing exhibition.”

Six x Six challenges curators to name the exhibitions that have mattered most to them. In this issue, Ionit Behar, Astria Suparak, Inti Guerrero, Gianni Jetzer, Sarah Demeuse, and Nikola Dietrich assemble their miniature pantheons. In Rigorous Research, the scholar Vittoria Martini deliberates the little-discussed 1970 Venice Biennale, a turning point for that venerable institution. In the gap opened by a political stalemate, the staff assumed control, and embraced experimentation and research. Research and reflection also connect the two essays in Rear Mirror. Ruba Katrib details the thinking behind her exhibition Puddle, pothole, portal, co-curated with the artist Camille Henrot at SculptureCenter, New York, describing their attempt to capture something of the weird, rambunctious spatiality of early Disney animations. Scott Rothkopf evinces, in turn, the extraordinary spatial and conceptual deliberation behind his recent Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Across this issue, then, the specificity of curatorial labor emerges—the thought needed to build aggregate meaning from disparate things in space. The word “curating” is not infinitely plastic. This, for us, is what it means. We all know how Humpy Dumpty ended up.


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The Cars. Wolfgang Tillmans. Verlag Der Buchhandlung Walther König.

Posted in photography on October 22nd, 2015
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“I wanted to show how cars appear in typical street view, which is rarely the subject of photographs. Cars are usually avoided in photography – one waits until a car has exited a view. The ordinary presence of cars is rarely worthy of representation. It’s always the special car, or the extreme traffic jam or, of course, the exciting crash that is being pictured. The Cars pays tribute to the shapes and forms we look at every day. How much time we spend with them, sitting inside them, the endless hours we stare at a dashboard. Even if we don’t own a car ourselves, their presence is unavoidable. Cars are everywhere. Their sheer number is the most crazy thing about them. They appear in our lives with excessive omnipresence. In their volume cars intrude upon public space, and the way they occupy streets and open areas is rarely challenged. Virtually wherever there are people, there are cars and they are visually intermingling in whatever we see. We are looking at the world from a car and cars are in the foreground, the background or in between of what is in our view. Where they are, they add a tone, a note, a presence, a noise to the setting they’re in. [...]”

€ 19.80

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Pavel Mára Photographs 1969-2014. KANT

Posted in books, photography on October 20th, 2015
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PAVEL MÁRA is a distinctive European photographer. Born in Prague in 1951, for almost two decades now he has been a teacher at the Institute of Creative Photography, Silesian University, Opava. That is the calling to which he was predestined by his art, which entails working with concepts and meticulously thinking things through. The look of his works often stems from new interpretations of the possibilities of the photographic medium.
Mára creates in series, some of which are remarkable depictions of the organic and inorganic world in geometric shapes. He achieves that, for example, by how he selects his shots. He does not use the usual technique of manipulating the photographic image. Often striking, surprising, and sometimes even unreal, colour is an independent component of Mára’s photographs. Yet he also employs a detailed and bewitchingly clear transcription of photographed reality. His work in series excludes chance; it leaves the viewer in no doubt about the photographer’s intentions.
As early as in the 1970s, Mára was among the few people in Czechoslovakia who did art photography in colour and, moreover, mostly in large formats. Of his early works, one mostly recalls the pictures of the precisely textured surfaces of technological objects painted in bright colours, for example,MECHANICAL STILL LIFES (1976–84). These are photographs that may reasonably be ranked among works of geometrical abstraction in other fields of art, even though they are at the same time quite concrete. He has been developing the principle to this day.
The human body became the main subject matter of Mára’s photographs. Using a simple method, he created the monumental TRIPTYCHS of nudes and portraits from 1990–93. The extraordinary impression they make consists in the sensed mystery of a shift of gaze. They were made without changing the position of the model by a vertical shift of the camera – the view from below, the view straight on, the view from above.
He made MECHANICAL CORPUSES (1997) using special approaches with coloured lighting, linking real bodies to unreal colours. The inventive staging of models with shaved heads in precisely centred compositions brought Mára to international attention.
The publication is based on the counterpoint of black-and-white and colour photographs, including, for example, BLACK CORPUSES: FAMILY (2001); the magical tonality of this series was achieved by printing black-and-white reversal film on colour reversal paper. NEGATIVE HEADS (2010), made in the scale of black, grey, and white, are, by contrast, digital portraits of a male model, defamiliarized by using geometric elements.
Pavel Mára’s whole oeuvre is pioneering. It is highly aestheticized but not calming; rather, it makes one uneasy. It is part of contemporary postmodern culture also because it is complete only when it has been installed, and in each case this is done for a particular space.


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Arts For Living. common room & Kim Förster. common books

Posted in architecture, Artist Book on October 18th, 2015
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Arts For Living takes a close look at the abrons arts center, a community art facility in the lower east side, as a case study for an architecture designed to address issues of public space and community life. the center was built during the 1970’s fiscal crisis and designed by prentice and chan, ohlhausen as a cultural institution with new educational facilities intended to enable, foster and serve the everyday activities of the local low-income population.

with essays by alan moore and kim förster, an interview with lo-yi chan and photographs by jason fulford.

designed by geoff han

printed by drukkerij mart.spruijt bv, amsterdam



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CURA #20. Ilaria Marotta and Andrea Baccin (Eds.)

Posted in art, distribution, magazines on October 16th, 2015
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CURA. No.20

FALL 2015
Cover by Allison Katz

INSIDE THE COVER Allison Katz. Pungent Painting text by Ruba Katrib – PORTRAITS IN THE EXHIBITION SPACE Wim Beeren and Tomorrow’s Museum by Lorenzo Benedetti – TALKING ABOUT Why Poetry? by Jean-Max Colard – POP-UP SECTION: DISPLAY ISSUE 01 You Display, I Display, We Display by Céline Condorelli and Gavin Wade – ABOUT Josh Kline by Ciara Moloney – PROJECT A Wonderful World Under Construction by GCC – SPOTLIGHT Ryan Gander in conversation with Adam Carr – ABOUT Michael E. Smith by Jenny Jaskey – A VISIT TO Pedro Barateiro: The Current Situation / Palmeiras Bravas, Museu Colecão Berardo, Lisboa with João Mourão & Luís Silva – ABOUT Marguerite Humeau by Hans Ulrich Obrist – HOT! – Olga Balema by Chris Sharp – Darja Bajagić by Franklin Melendez – Sascha Braunig by Rose Bouthillier – Rachel Rose by Frances Loeffler – PROJECT Villa Design Group 
and Nicoletta Lambertucci – PROJECT Lena Henke and Anna Gritz

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David Horvitz. Mood Disorder book launch @ Randy’s Donuts Parking Lot. Los Angeles. 17.10.2015

Posted in Chert, events, food, poetry on October 15th, 2015


AT 11:59 PM.

Xiu Xiu will have a gong to whisper into.*

Ed Steck will call in from Tampa Bay, FL and read poems over speaker phone.**

Michael Smoler will be telepathically reading poems from a donut store in London simultaneously with the launch.

Books will be sold for $15 us cash out of the trunk of my mom’s car. No receipts will be given.

* Xiu Xiu will buy dounuts for the first 21 people who whisper into the gong.

** Unless he falls asleep.

Mood Disorder documents the propagation of a photograph of David Horvitz across the internet. The image—a self portrait of the artist with his head in his hands, ocean waves crashing in the background—was initially uploaded to the Wikimedia Commons, and placed on various Wikipedia pages. From there, the image began to circulate, appearing on over a hundred websites as a “stock” photo to illustrate articles on a wide range of mental health and wellness issues.

David Horvitz: Mood Disorder
With a text by Ed Steck. Co-published by Chert and Motto Books, Berlin. Designed by The Future.

35 × 25 cm
72 Pages, Staple bound
ISBN: 978-1-927354-23-0
First Edition (2015)

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