ROTE SOCKEN IN ST. PETERSBURG. Erik Steinbrecher. Rakete.co.

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, Motto Berlin store on March 27th, 2018
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ROTE SOCKEN IN ST. PETERSBURG
An edit by Erik Steinbrecher
rakete.co [2007]

 

The context is Russian. Topical. The country on everyone’s lips! 

Steinbrecher had gone to the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg, and littered the place with his ‘embassy’ of red socks.  

Red connotes protest, revolution, a shout out for change. But in this era of ‘crisis’—i.e., no protest, but just a steady gaze-malaise of disbelief—red is about as revolutionary as my big toe. And red socks? They’re about as anti-protest red as you can get. Red socks are worn by that man with Budapesters. Red-sock-wearers seem to be daring. They are the guys who waltz into the cafe with silk-scarf flair calling out, Cappuccino!  

Red socks, however, are worn by those (like myself) who have an extreme need to impress their personality into the world. Tacky, loud, ladder-climbing rats. Red-socks-wearers didn’t get enough attention as a child (or perhaps too much). 

I don’t know if Erik Steinbrecher wears red socks. If he does, then we can throw this whole take in the garbage. This is the man, after all, who left red socks in the Hermitage, the bastion of fine arts, culture, connaissance, connoisseurdombombasticity. At least they weren’t dirty.

April von Stauffenberg

32 pages
Offset / Pantone Warm Red
Printed in Lithuania

Size: 19 x 12
Weight: 220 g
Binding: Softcover
€10.00
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Revue Or @ Motto Berlin. 29.03.2018

Posted in events on March 26th, 2018

Revue_Or

Revue Or @ Motto Berlin. 29.03.2018
from 7pm

Presentation and readings with poets
Anna Serra (France)
Cristian Forte (Argentina)
Kinga Toth (Hungary)

OR review, is a new relation between poetry and paper. An app makes it possible to hear the poem from the very mouth and instruments of its writer. During each listening, the page is enhanced by a visual poem escaping from the paper.

Download the App Here

http://orrevue.com/

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Slavs and Tatars @ Motto Berlin. 05.04.2018

Posted in events on March 24th, 2018
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Slavs and Tatars @ Motto Berlin. 05.04.2018

Book Launch / Presentation 7pm

Slavs and Tatars, Motto Books and Westfälischer Kunstverein are proud to present Kirchgängerbanger : a new, bi-lingual (Eng/DE) reader on Johan Georg Hamann, the 18th century polemicist, frenemy of Kant, and proto-Postmodernist who mixed faith and sexuality in ways that would make even Bataille blush: “My coarse imagination has never been able to conceive of the creative spirit without genitalia.” Includes the triple-platinum hits “New apology of the Letter H” and “New Apology of the Letter H by Itself.” Offset print, 92 pages, 20 x 14 cm. 12€

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Discwoman @ Motto Berlin. 21-22.03.2018.

Posted in events, Motto Berlin event, Motto Berlin store on March 20th, 2018

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Discwoman merchandise pop-up @ Motto Berlin

Founded by Frankie Decaiza Hutchinson, Emma Burgess-Olson and Christine McCharen-Tran, Discwoman is a New York-based platform, collective, and booking agency—that showcases and represents cis women, trans women, and genderqueer artists in electronic music. Started as a two-day festival in September 2014 at Bossa Nova Civic Club, Discwoman has since produced and curated events in 15+ cities—working with over 250 DJs and producers to-date.

From the 21st-22nd of March, they will be selling a selection of merchandise at Motto, including their popular tees and sweatshirts.

 

Ryan Foerster. Set of 9 Zines.

Posted in 2016, art, Artist magazine, zines on March 11th, 2018
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Ryan Foerster

Set of 9 zines

42€

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Turmoil CTM Magazine

Posted in distribution, music, Wholesale on March 7th, 2018

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Turmoil CTM Magazine 2018

This 108-page publication presents diverse points of entry into CTM 2018’s Turmoil theme via essays and articles authored by music journalists, researchers, theorists, and participating artists.

Covering topics such as identity politics, social media call out culture, strategies in exploring and hacking artificial intelligence in music, as well as insights into musical genres ranging from gabber to metal to experimental improvisation, the magazine brings together diverse voices exclaiming, confronting, examining and encompassing aspects of the Turmoil theme. Portraits and interviews of individual artists, collectives and scenes round out the publication, which was created as a support to the 2018 edition’s inquiry into the potential of sound and music to invigorate resilience and awareness at a time when we have begun normalising the ongoing barrage of political, social, and environmental crises, and the resulting disquiet that resonates through our on- and offline lives.

Content:

Uneasy Times Demand Uneasy Music
By Jan RohlfThe Sound of New Futures: In Pursuit of Different Truths
By Mollie Zhang

The Abyss Stares Back… And It’s Smiling
Colin H. Van Eeckhout in conversation with Louise Brown

Late-Phase Identity Politics
Terre Thaemlitz in conversation with Marc Schwegler

The Kids Are Alt-Right – Tracing the Soundtrack of Neo-Reactionary Turmoil
By Jens Balzer

In Sonic Defiance of Extinction
By Rory Gibb, Anja Kanngieser & Paul Rekret

Distributed Hypocrisy
By James Ginzburg

Calling Out For Context
By Christine Kakaire

This is Now a History of the Way I Love It
By Claire Tolan

Listening to Voyager
By Paul Steinbeck

Why Do We Want Our Computers to Improvise?
By George E. Lewis

Minds, Machines, and Centralisation: Why Musicians Need to Hack AI Now
By Peter Kirn

Music from the Petri Dish
Guy Ben-Ary in conversation with Christian de Lutz & Jan Rohlf

I Need it to Forgive Me
By Nora Khan

Gabber Overdrive – Noise, Horror, and Acceleration
By Hillegonda C. Rietveld

“I’m Trying to Imagine a Space a Little Better Than What We’ve Inherited”
Kilbourne in conversation with Christina Plett

Raving at 200 BPM: Inside Poland’s Neo-Gabber Underground
By Derek Opperman

Ernest Berk and Electronic Music
By Ian Helliwell

Starship 17.

Posted in Artist magazine, Starship on March 1st, 2018
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Starship 17

Winter 2018

with contributions by:

Mitchell Anderson, Marie Angeletti, Tenzing Barshee, Gerry Bibby, Mercedes Bunz, Stefan Burger, David Bussel, Eric D. Clark, Jay Chung, Tony Conrad, Eduardo Costa, Hans-Christian Dany, Nikola Dietrich, Levi Easterbrooks, Martin Ebner, Stephanie Fezer, Julian Göthe, Dunja Herzog, Karl Holmqvist, Stephan Janitzky, Verena Kathrein, Jakob Kolding, Chris Kraus, Veit Laurent Kurz, Quinn Latimer, Park McArthur, Robert McKenzie, Robert Meijer, Luzie Meyer, Ariane Müller, Shahryar Nashat, Viktor Neumann, Theresa Patzschke, Monika Senz, Natasha Soobramanien, Vera Tollmann, Anne Turyn, Antek Walczak, Mikhail Wassmer, Scott C. Weaver, Florian Zeyfang

140 pages, color, EUR 8

edited by: Gerry Bibby, Nikola Dietrich, Martin Ebner, Ariane Müller, Henrik Olesen

Graphic design: Dan Solbach
Cover: Martin Ebner
Poster: Marie Angeletti

Park McArthur for Starship, Studs, 2018.
1000 magazines pierced and bejeweled

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