Atom. Fleet Ilya & Ekaterina Bazhenova-Yamasaki. SoyaPress

Posted in Artist's book, books, photography on September 23rd, 2022
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Printed in the edition of 200, Atom is an exploration of desire, beauty, loneliness, and introspection. It is also a reflection of our shifting understanding of the body and spaces we’ve inhabited in the last two turbulent years, and a project firmly rooted in the transformative power of the female gaze.

Atom captures a range of leather pieces by Fleet Ilya as tools of self-discovery, intimate connection, and collaborative creativity. The book, edited by Fleet Ilya co-founder Resha Sharma, comprises portraits of five heroines within their private spaces, still lives, immersive nature shots by Bazhenova-Yamasaki, and poetic text by Beata Duvaker.

The book is a result of almost a decade-long collaboration between Bazhenova-Yamasaki and Fleet Ilya. It combines the plurality of female perspectives and voices from the collaborators and the heroines depicted in its pages – a testament to that underrepresented point of view when it comes to photography, sexuality, and leatherwork.

Atom is a book of erotic photography that reinvents erotic photography, strips it to viscerally honest corporeality, deep-rooted intimacy, and irresistible beauty of the small details, be it a flower or a leather strap. It offers a sensory journey through photography and writing – alongside the pleasure of an exquisite object to hold or have at home.

Edition of 200, numbered.

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The Beirut Experience. Jean-Paul Felley, Olivier Kaeser. attitudes

Posted in art, books, exhibition catalogue on September 22nd, 2022
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The book has been produced on the occasion of the exhibition The Beirut Experience at Beirut Art Center in Beirut (12.10 – 19.11.2011) and at Villa Bernasconi in Lancy, Geneva (20.04 – 10.06.2012).

Artists: Lara Almarcegui, Marc Bauer, Tony Chakar, Marcelline Delbecq, Latifa Echakhch, Eric Hattan, Mark Lewis, Adrien Missika, Estefania Peñafiel Loaiza, Dan Perjovschi.

The edition includes Vacant buildings in the Hotel district, Beirut by Lara Almarcegui.

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Tresor: True Stories. Dimitri Hegemann, Paul Hockenos, Regina Baer. Tresor

Posted in books, music on September 15th, 2022
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Tresor: True Stories is the first printed excavation of Tresor’s legendary history.

Digging deeply into its rich archives, the venerable institution has unearthed countless treasures from its over three-decade old history. Over 400 never before seen photographs, flyers, faxes and other illustrate a story that intersects with the most important social and musical trend in the modern history of Berlin.

The story is told with the voices of those that were there – over 40 protagonists share their first-hand reminiscences of the ‘big bang’ that launched techno into the world. Through the story of Tresor, the book charts the heady days of 80s West Berlin through to the explosion of new energy that midwifed in the new social reality of reunified Germany. This is a unique and essential printed monument to the institution that changed electronic music forever, and the city that allowed it to exist.

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journal de Bertille. Julien Carreyn. La Lionel Rose

Posted in Artist's book, books, photography on September 7th, 2022
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J. Carreyn
journal de Bertille

J. Adam, R. Bacourt, M. Bernard, B. Boros-Turquin, A. Bournazeau, M. Bremer, M. Dorchies, C. Farina, S. Fiorucci, V. Foucher, A. Gayet, J. Jennifer, O. Jones, C. Leconte, J. Lempert, G. Morandi, M. Ogier, B. Porcher, A.Pyvka, C. Raimondi, E. Spalletti, N. Sutter-Shudo, S. Toulouse, S. Verastegui, V. Villard

Printed with Risograph.

Handmade numbered edition of 16.

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7.09 from 6.30pm: Ho Rui An presenting Tables | Factories, in conversation with Nut Srisuwan @ Motto Berlin

Posted in Artist Book, books, events, Motto Berlin event, politics on September 3rd, 2022
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Please join us for the presentation of Tables | Factories with author and artist Ho Rui An in conversation with Nut Srisuwan

Wednesday 7 September
from 6.30pm

Motto Berlin
Salitzer Str. 68 (im Hinterhof)
10997 Berlin

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Ho Rui An is an artist and writer working at the intersections of contemporary art, cinema, performance and theory. Working primarily across the mediums of lecture, essay and film, he probes into the ways by which images are produced, circulate and disappear within contexts of globalism and governance. He has presented projects at the Bangkok Art Biennale; Asian Art Biennial; Gwangju Biennale; Jakarta Biennale; Sharjah Biennial; Kochi-Muziris Biennale; Kunsthalle Wien; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore; and Para Site, Hong Kong. In 2019, he was awarded the International Film Critics’ (FIPRESCI) Prize at the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany. In 2018, he was a fellow of the DAAD Artists-in-Berlin Program.

Nut Srisuwan is an independent researcher and curator based in Bangkok and Leipzig. His research examines the interrelations between subjects in transnational contexts, such as national identities, politics and migratory movements. As a co-founder of the artistic and curatorial collective “Charoen Contemporaries”, he also works together with other practitioners in finding new models for the art ecosystem in Thailand.

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Tables | Factories
Ho Rui An
Published by BANGKOK CITYCITY GALLERY

The process of preparing this book began with looking at photographs of large meeting tables around which Chinese and Singaporean public officials gathered during the many Chinese government study missions to Singapore throughout the 1990s. While such images might seem unremarkable today, the appearance of former revolutionaries of the Maoist era as sedentary technocrats marks the historic emergence of a distinct political imaginary in a time when “the economy” was displacing class struggle as the primary subject of governance in China.

It was at the table that these technocrats, having extricated themselves from the masses, devised the concept of the socialist market economy to frame the economic reforms that were launched by Deng Xiaoping in 1978. As they insisted on the compatibility of the market economy with the prevailing socialist social contract, the reformers articulated their turn towards the market as a decision informed not by the “invisible” manner through which the market allocates its resources, but by the assumed transparency of its information flows, which they believed would make visible what the party-state had been previously unable to see.

Yet, to the extent that this process of “seeking truth from facts”, as the reformers put it, is founded upon a set of separations—the party-state from the masses, information from ideology, the economic from the political—what ultimately underwrites the total visibility apparently provided by the table is the concealment of that which must not be allowed to appear as information in order for the logic of the market to obtain: the exploitation of labour.

It is on this basis that the factory can be construed as the table’s forgotten origin and impenetrable interior, and the gate that circumscribes the compound the limit of the market’s capacity for making things visible. Designed to spatially contain industrial labour and hide their exploitation from the public sphere, the factory gate is as close as the technocrat would get, as seen during the factory’s opening ceremony, to the world of labour under a capitalist mode of production. In thus proposing a convergence between tables and factories and examining their respective regimes of (in)visibility across the contexts of Singapore and Reform-era China, this collection of images and texts seeks to understand how the seemingly disparate worlds centred around these two objects in fact call forth each other to produce our deeply unsettled contemporary condition—one where the recognition that accrues to visibility has replaced freedom from exploitation as the most that the people can ever demand after the revolution’s untimely end.

Order the book here

Futuros Mejores. Bartlebooth (Eds.). Bartlebooth

Posted in architecture, art, Artist's book, books, politics, research, writing on September 1st, 2022
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Futuros mejores condensa conversaciones, voces y proyectos a través de los cuales discutir e imaginar futuros espaciales más justos. Futuros que, desde las ruinas del presente, las violencias y exclusiones, imaginan alternativas capaces de vislumbrar nuevas posibilidades. Arquitecturas amables con otras especies y territorios, prácticas espaciales para la hospitalidad, mediadoras de memorias orales y microbianas, nuevos imaginarios para el aprendizaje, nuevas (y no tan nuevas) arquitecturas para el cuidado más allá de la vivienda y tecnologías domésticas al servicio del bien común para una producción espacial todavía por venir.

Autores: Husos Arquitecturas (Diego Barajas y Camilo García), Mariana Pestana, Isabel Gutiérrez Sánchez, Candela Morado, Anna Puigjaner, Superflux, Alejandro Galliano, La Escuela Nunca y los Otros Futuros, Studio Ossidiana.

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Prunella Clough a small thing edgily. Camila McHugh (Ed.). Floating Opera Press

Posted in art, books, exhibition catalogue on August 23rd, 2022
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With texts by Amy Sillman and Emily LaBarge

Exhibition catalogue with twenty color illustrations of paintings by the British painter Prunella Clough (1919–1999). Published to commemorate the first German presentation of the artist’s work at June gallery, Berlin, the book focuses on the artist’s late-career departure from the industrial figuration for which she was known into a wry, quietly influential approach to abstraction. Included works date from 1960–1993. Prunella Clough’s abstraction developed largely out of step with any artistic movement or milieu: impervious to the advent of Pop, she was more taken by the Minimalism of Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt, which may have accentuated her sense of restraint. Amy Sillman calls Clough “a ‘conceptual painter’ avant la lettre,” while Merlin James emphasizes how she “anticipated many traits in post-modern painting.” Awarded the Jerwood Painting Prize in 1999 shortly before her death, and recognized with significant solo exhibitions at Annely Juda Fine Art Gallery (1989), the Camden Arts Center (1996), and a posthumous Tate Britain retrospective (2007), Clough’s legacy remains bogged down by emphasis on her early figurative works, tethering her innovative abstraction too tightly to an industrial origin story. This catalogue is a remedy to this situation.

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Tables | Factories. Ho Rui An. BANGKOK CITYCITY GALLERY

Posted in Artist Book, books, politics on August 21st, 2022
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The process of preparing this book began with looking at photographs of large meeting tables around which Chinese and Singaporean public officials gathered during the many Chinese government study missions to Singapore throughout the 1990s. While such images might seem unremarkable today, the appearance of former revolutionaries of the Maoist era as sedentary technocrats marks the historic emergence of a distinct political imaginary in a time when “the economy” was displacing class struggle as the primary subject of governance in China.

It was at the table that these technocrats, having extricated themselves from the masses, devised the concept of the socialist market economy to frame the economic reforms that were launched by Deng Xiaoping in 1978. As they insisted on the compatibility of the market economy with the prevailing socialist social contract, the reformers articulated their turn towards the market as a decision informed not by the “invisible” manner through which the market allocates its resources, but by the assumed transparency of its information flows, which they believed would make visible what the party-state had been previously unable to see.

Yet, to the extent that this process of “seeking truth from facts”, as the reformers put it, is founded upon a set of separations—the party-state from the masses, information from ideology, the economic from the political—what ultimately underwrites the total visibility apparently provided by the table is the concealment of that which must not be allowed to appear as information in order for the logic of the market to obtain: the exploitation of labour.

It is on this basis that the factory can be construed as the table’s forgotten origin and impenetrable interior, and the gate that circumscribes the compound the limit of the market’s capacity for making things visible. Designed to spatially contain industrial labour and hide their exploitation from the public sphere, the factory gate is as close as the technocrat would get, as seen during the factory’s opening ceremony, to the world of labour under a capitalist mode of production. In thus proposing a convergence between tables and factories and examining their respective regimes of (in)visibility across the contexts of Singapore and Reform-era China, this collection of images and texts seeks to understand how the seemingly disparate worlds centred around these two objects in fact call forth each other to produce our deeply unsettled contemporary condition—one where the recognition that accrues to visibility has replaced freedom from exploitation as the most that the people can ever demand after the revolution’s untimely end.

Order here

UNIVERSAL TONGUE (second edition). Anouk Kruithof

Posted in Artist's book, books, photography on August 18th, 2022
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Universal Tongue celebrates the great diversity of the global dance kaleidoscope in the era of the Internet. It was born from visual artist Anouk Kruithof’s fascination with dance videos distributed online as a representation of self-expression, cultural identity, empowerment and fun.

In collaboration with a team of 50 researchers from across the globe, she sourced over 8800 dance videos online, which were edited down to a 1000 unique dance styles that she blended into a dynamic 8 channel video installation with a four hour duration, accompanied by a unifying soundtrack. The researchers provided a short text for each dance style presented in their found videos. These 1000 edited texts combined with screenshots taken from the videos introduce the origin, background and meaning of the dance styles. Et voilà! this ‘dancyclopedia’ through the jungle of the Internet was born!

This book shows how dance can be a way of knowing about the world. It is by no means exclusive, final, or academic. It is a statement. Organized in alphabetical order by the first letter of each dance style, it confirms the horizontality of Universal Tongue, by erasing typical categories of the world order, such as country, continent, or culture. Instead, it points us towards a more inclusive world with a limitless exchange—a world where simply everyone is a dancer.

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The Jacques Lacan Foundation. Susan Finlay. MOIST

Posted in books, novel, writing on August 16th, 2022
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It’s fall (or autumn) 2018. The Trump administration wants to fortify the United States-Mexico border, Robert ‘Beto’ O’Rourke is running for Senate, and British grifter Nicki Smith has just secured a “low-paid glamour job” at the University of Texas’ Jacques Lacan Foundation. In between sleeping with the air-conditioning repair guy (or man) and watching Kate Moss make-up commercials (or advertisements) Nicki completes the first ever American-English translation of Lacan’s newly discovered and highly controversial notebook – without knowing any French. An Anglo-American comedy of manners about identity and class The Jacques Lacan Foundation reveals—and revels in—the numerous pretensions that surround academia and authorship, and the institutions that foster them.

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