PIN-UP #19. The Great Indoors. Felix Burrichter (ed.)

Posted in architecture, art, distribution, magazines on November 26th, 2015
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PIN-UP issue 19 : The great Indoors

Fall/Winter 2015/16

FEATURING Jean Nouvel, Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli, Wendy Goodman, Pedro Friedeberg, Trix and Robert Haussmann, Ugo Rondinone, Yrjö Kukkapuro, Luca Cipelletti, and Mos Architects.

PLUS Jessi Reaves, Soft Baroque, Toshiko Mori and Tomas Maier, Candida Höfer, Carmen Herrera, Avery Singer, Mickalerie Thomas, Kaari Upson, Sahra Motalebi, Lena Henke, and Diane Simpson.


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Stan Douglas. The Secret Agent. Ludion, Wiels

Posted in art, exhibition catalogue on November 5th, 2015
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Stan Douglas’s The Secret Agent explores the turbulent Seventies and the history of Portugal, which was shaking off a dictatorship and losing its colonies in those years.

The book contains three works by the Canadian artist. The video installation The Secret Agent (première in WIELS in October 2015) tells a story originally written by Joseph Conrad in 1907. Douglas has retained the characters and the plot, but transferred them to the turmoil of Lisbon soon after the Carnation Revolution in 1974. The book contains the original script and an extensive collection of stills and production images.

The second work in the book is Disco Angola, a series of eight staged historical photographs – four in New York, four in Angola – that show the parallels between two more or less simultaneous moments: the hedonistic glam culture of New York nightlife in the Seventies and the civil war in Angola.

The third work, Luanda–Kinshasa, is a 6-hour jazz film set in 1974. It contains eleven songs recorded in the legendary 30th Street Studio, where Miles Davis, Glenn Gould and others have worked.

Stan Douglas is an artist. His films, videos and photographs have been shown internationally since 1970 at events such as Documenta ix, x and xi (1992, 1997, 2002) and three Venice biennials (1990, 2001, 2005). He has had solo exhibitions in leading museums in Europe and North America. Douglas lives and works in Vancouver.

This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition INTERREGNUM at Wiels, 9 October 2015 – 10 January 2016.


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Atopolis. (sic), Wiels

Posted in art, exhibition catalogue on November 5th, 2015
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This book is published on the occasion of the eponymous exhibition produced by the Wiels and curated by Dirk Snauwaert and Charlotte Friling. It held at the Manège de Sury, Mons (European Capital of Culture), from June to October 2015.

This project takes as its starting point the history of Mons and the Borinage, comparing it with the history of the modern age on an international scale, and relating it to the present time through the voices of some twenty artists questioning our times and our environment.

What we generally call “modernity,” that history of multiple conquests targeting control over reality through technology and science, also refers to the exploration through art of the hidden dimensions of our behaviour, our ideas and our subjectivity.

Atopolis proposes to rediscover models of social and cultural utopia developed by personalities from our region, but the exhibition also unveils captivating works created by artists who are watchful and critical of the era of globalisation in which we are living, that of uniform channels of information and free trade, leading both to an unprecedented connectivity and to a loss of frames of reference.

Atopolis, a title which echoes the ideas of Edouard Glissant, a writer who has philosophised about identities and migratory movements, seems an excellent metaphor of our digital era, given the importance it grants to the development of models of cohabiting and coexistence which seem to hark back to the social utopias that have emerged from our region.

This publication is composed of two interdepedent parts: one with the texts of four different authors on all the works at show; the second one with visual and textual elements from the Mundaneum Archives, excerpts of texts of Edouard Glissant, Raoul Vaneigem, Paul Lafargue, a.o., and unpublished material of Allan Sekula on the Borinage.

With Saâdane Afif, Nevin Aladağ, Francis Alÿs, Danai Anesiadou, El Anatsui, Yto Barrada, Huma Bhabha, Vincen Beeckman, Vlassis Caniaris, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Meschac Gaba, Jef Geys, Thomas Hirschhorn, David Medalla, Adrian Melis, Benoit Platéus, Walter Swennen, Diego Tonus, Jack Whitten…

Edited Sébastien Biset and Raphaël Pirenne (sic)

Textes by Jan Baetens, Sébastien Biset, Yves Citton, Charlotte Friling, Raphaël Pirenne, Dirk Snauwaert, Yoann Van Parys, Elvan Zabunyan.



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Peter Downsbrough. Collection of Publications Now Available at Motto

Posted in art, Artist Book, books on November 4th, 2015

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A collection of Peter Downsbrough publications ranging from 1975 to 2015 is now available at Motto. The collection includes ‘Position’, an inclusive monograph on the work of Peter Downsbrough.

Available on our online shop

foundprints books 002 (set). Soichi Suzuki

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, Japan on November 3rd, 2015
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A set of four leporellos by Soichi Suzuki

10 x 8 x 3.8 cm



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Rob Pruitt’s eBay Flea Market: Year 1. Tommaso Speretta (ed.). Bruno

Posted in art, Artist Book, books, distribution on October 27th, 2015
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This book is an unconventional autobiography. It retraces one year in the life of Rob Pruitt through the quotidian objects that the artist once loved, consumed, then felt he didn’t need anymore. An extension of the real-world flea markets, that he has been organizing since the early 1990′s, this particular collection of belongings sold on eBay from September 23 2013- September 23 2014 unearths precious fragments of Pruitt’s life while revealing his most material desires.


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Posted in art, distribution, photography on October 23rd, 2015
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Clearly indebted to Andy Warhol’s ironic identity play in his photobooth self portraits, these photographs were shot for the series The Exquisite Self Portraits, 2010, in which Rob Pruitt collaged onto large canvases three or four horizontal bands featuring photo fragments of his head and chest.

This publication is the fifth in a series of artist books dedicated to b/w portraits.


€ 18.00

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The Exhibitionist #11. Jens Hoffman (Ed.). The Exhibitionist

Posted in art, critique, distribution, magazines, writing on October 23rd, 2015
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Jens Hoffmann, Julian Myers-Szupinska, and Liz Glass
A peculiarity of the current field of curating is an ongoing contestation over the very meaning of “to curate.” As Alice said in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, “The question is whether you can make words mean so many different things.” Humpty Dumpty answers, “The question is which [meaning] is to be master—that’s all.”

On the cover of this issue is Thomas Ruff’s 1989 portrait of a young Hans Ulrich Obrist. If this fresh-faced guy has done more than most to consolidate the identity of the curator—as a ubiquitous, cosmopolitan character, tirelessly promoting him- or herself, an exhibitionist of the global age—he has also presided over that identity’s confusion and multiplication. Is the curator, as Obrist often describes the role, a catalyst? Or is she, to quote Obrist’s frequent collaborator Suzanne Pagé, a modest commis de l’artiste, an “artist’s clerk”?

Curating has become a global concern, yet many languages still even lack a steady term for it. Meanwhile, in some circles, “curation” has a gained a buzzword-ish currency, signaling taste and discrimination across a dizzying array of cultural activities, from so-called “data curation” to creating playlists and dinner menus. The hope, it seems, is that a renewed connoisseurship might discern value amid the profusions of a global market—separate the wheat from the cultural chaff—even if it means, too, that Kanye West now has as much claim on the term “curator” as Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev or Okwui Enwezor. The more we stretch the word, it seems, the easier it becomes to hijack. It is time for some clarity.

In Attitude, João Ribas meditates on this semantic drift of the word “curating” into marketing, where it is proposed as a cure-all for digital excess and consumer glut. Following John Searle, who warns that the terms we use control the field of meaning, Ribas argues that contemporary curators must battle to retain the understanding that “curating” has held historically in the field of art, beyond connoisseurship and mere selection. He emphasizes in particular the spatial and temporal character of exhibitions, which may still offer the possibility of resisting the behavioral paradigms inflicted by capitalist urbanism and digital technology.

Geopolitical space is a central concern for several essays in this issue. In Back in the Day, Clémentine Deliss contends with the Museum of Modern Art’s notorious 1984 exhibition “Primitivism” in 20th Century Art: Affinities of the Tribal and the Modern, which “remains bedeviled by criticisms and emotional refutations that are hard to dissolve.” Comparing that exhibition’s model of “formal affinity” to a recent exhibition by the Senegalese artist and curator El Hadji Sy, she argues for exhibitionary methods that might “effect a remediating affirmation” of ethnographic objects in order to recover something of their “conceptual code.” Missing in Action republishes passages from Rasheed Araeen’s introduction to his 1989 exhibition of British Afro-Asian artists, The Other Story. By assembling the fragments of their collective story, Araeen dismantles the chauvinism of a “master art history” that had excluded non-Western contemporary artists.

In Assessments, Claire Bishop, Cristina Freire, Tobi Maier, and Octavio Zaya address the exhibition Histórias Mestiças (Mestizo Histories), a trenchant critique of Brazil’s racial democracy curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Lilia Moritz Schwarcz at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake in São Paulo. The writers find consonance around one remarkable installation that juxtaposed photographs of indigenous people by Claudia Andujar, 18th-century watercolors of the “discovery” of Brazil by Joaquim José de Miranda, and drawings from the 1970s by Taniki Manippi-theri, a Yanomami shaman. Says Bishop, “Such an anthropological gaze can diminish the present-ism of contemporary art and allow it to become a method or system of thinking. Would that more curators, in more countries, had the nerve to investigate so unflinchingly cherished national myths.” Curators’ Favorites asks contributors to elaborate on an exhibition that has inspired their thinking. Guy Brett describes a 1979 installation by the Brazilian conceptual artist Cildo Meireles, an allegory aimed at the military dictatorship in power at the time. Natasha Ginwala contends with The One Year Drawing Project, an experimental exchange of artworks across Sri Lanka meditating on the traumas of that nation’s civil war. And Vincent Honoré considers the Musée d’art moderne et contemporain in Geneva, claiming the museum itself as a “constant, ever-changing exhibition.”

Six x Six challenges curators to name the exhibitions that have mattered most to them. In this issue, Ionit Behar, Astria Suparak, Inti Guerrero, Gianni Jetzer, Sarah Demeuse, and Nikola Dietrich assemble their miniature pantheons. In Rigorous Research, the scholar Vittoria Martini deliberates the little-discussed 1970 Venice Biennale, a turning point for that venerable institution. In the gap opened by a political stalemate, the staff assumed control, and embraced experimentation and research. Research and reflection also connect the two essays in Rear Mirror. Ruba Katrib details the thinking behind her exhibition Puddle, pothole, portal, co-curated with the artist Camille Henrot at SculptureCenter, New York, describing their attempt to capture something of the weird, rambunctious spatiality of early Disney animations. Scott Rothkopf evinces, in turn, the extraordinary spatial and conceptual deliberation behind his recent Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Across this issue, then, the specificity of curatorial labor emerges—the thought needed to build aggregate meaning from disparate things in space. The word “curating” is not infinitely plastic. This, for us, is what it means. We all know how Humpy Dumpty ended up.


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CURA #20. Ilaria Marotta and Andrea Baccin (Eds.)

Posted in art, distribution, magazines on October 16th, 2015
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CURA. No.20

FALL 2015
Cover by Allison Katz

INSIDE THE COVER Allison Katz. Pungent Painting text by Ruba Katrib – PORTRAITS IN THE EXHIBITION SPACE Wim Beeren and Tomorrow’s Museum by Lorenzo Benedetti – TALKING ABOUT Why Poetry? by Jean-Max Colard – POP-UP SECTION: DISPLAY ISSUE 01 You Display, I Display, We Display by Céline Condorelli and Gavin Wade – ABOUT Josh Kline by Ciara Moloney – PROJECT A Wonderful World Under Construction by GCC – SPOTLIGHT Ryan Gander in conversation with Adam Carr – ABOUT Michael E. Smith by Jenny Jaskey – A VISIT TO Pedro Barateiro: The Current Situation / Palmeiras Bravas, Museu Colecão Berardo, Lisboa with João Mourão & Luís Silva – ABOUT Marguerite Humeau by Hans Ulrich Obrist – HOT! – Olga Balema by Chris Sharp – Darja Bajagić by Franklin Melendez – Sascha Braunig by Rose Bouthillier – Rachel Rose by Frances Loeffler – PROJECT Villa Design Group 
and Nicoletta Lambertucci – PROJECT Lena Henke and Anna Gritz

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C Magazine #127 Poetry. Amish Morrell. C Magazine

Posted in art, distribution, magazines, Motto Charlottenborg event, poetry on October 13th, 2015
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Issue 127 is guest edited by by Kari Cwynar, Danielle St-Amour and cheyanne turions, and features CAConrad on (Soma)tic Ritual Collaborations, Nasrin Himada on Positioning, “Three Parts on Poetry,” with contributions by Hanne Lippard, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Tiziana La Melia, Stacy Doris and Lisa Robertson, and Rachel Valinsky, an artist project by Alex Turgeon, and poems by Amy De’Ath, Andrea Lukic, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Taocheng Wang and Aisha Sasha John. Also included are reviews of exhibitions and books, as well as our regular sections On Writing by Lucy Ives and Inventory by Robin Simpson.


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