Harvard Design Magazine #45. Jennifer Sigler, Leah Whitman-Salkin (Eds.). Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Posted in architecture, art, critique, design, distribution, magazines, Motto Berlin store, Theory, Wholesale, writing on April 26th, 2018

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harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_3harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_4harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_5 harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_6harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_7harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_9 harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_8harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_10 harvard_design_magazine_2018_into_the_woods_motto_11Harvard Design Magazine 45 – Into the Woods | Spring/summer 2018

To go “into the woods” is to enter both nightmare and wonderment, chaos and serenity. The woods are the threatening realm of wolves and witches, yet also a space of peace and introspection. They confound and illuminate, disorient and clarify, endanger and protect. The woods are where we “come to our senses,” and where we embrace our wilder selves. They are a space of complex life forms and ecological destruction; of growth and decay; of fantasy and ritual; of secrets and control; of hiding and? the hidden.

The woods are often framed as a nonurban place; an entity separate from, and opposed to, the city—even the world; an eternal refuge that can smoothly be entered and exited, gone into and back out of. But how much of our woods still remains to go into—and on what terms?

As designers, we encounter the woods as building site, as obstacle, and as resource—territory to be cleared, but also to be preserved, cultivated, tamed, or simulated. Wood itself—along with its products like lumber, wood pulp, silvichemicals, and charcoal—fuel the building industry and feed architecture. In a period of accelerated climate change, the planet’s woods are disappearing, burning up, threatening and threatened by human existence. How can we holistically address the woods and its ecosystems, and the life and life-giving power they contain?

This issue of Harvard Design Magazine treks into the woods to come to terms with its precarious status as habitat and resource, and to challenge assumptions about wood as material. We won’t be “out of the woods”—this looping conundrum—any time soon, even if the woods as we once knew it, and might still imagine it, has ceased to exist. At the intersection of wilderness, urbanization, and myth, “Into the Woods” embraces contradiction, challenges destruction, and revisits our roots, biological and architectural alike.

“Into the Woods” combines contributions by noted critics and theorists including Milica Topalovic, Lawrence Buell, T. J. Demos, Rosetta Elkin, Jack Halberstam, and Maria Tatar; practitioners Dogma, Alexander Brodsky, Dilip Da Cunha, Eelco Hooftman, and Paulo Tavares; as well as artists Tang Chang, Maria Thereza Alves, Janet Cardiff, and Bas Princen; anthropologists Anna Tsing and Eduardo Kohn; and philosopher Giorgio Agamben.

Harvard Design Magazine 45 is edited by Jennifer Sigler and Leah Whitman-Salkin, and published by the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD).

Language: English
Pages: 248
Size: 30.5 x 22 cm
Weight: 810 g
Binding: Softcover
ISBN: 725274577118
€15.00

Distributed. David Blamey & Brad Haylock (Eds.). Open Editions.

Posted in art, books, critique, Motto Berlin store, writing on April 25th, 2018
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For those who would seek to influence others, the dissemination of ideas is
paramount. Similarly, for those holding ambition to secrete knowledge for reasons of
authority, or to protect the fruits of intellectual labour for reasons of profit or ethical
concern, distribution is key. Certainly before, but more importantly since the
Gutenberg Bible, the predicament of the power of knowledge has lain not with its
generation but with the control of its dispersion.

This new volume in the critically acclaimed Occasional Table series of books
published by Open Editions focuses attention on the act of distribution as a subject
for serious creative consideration and one of great social and economic importance.
Contributors from a variety of backgrounds paint a big picture that embraces the
actions of the individual alongside the workings of global markets. From the
attention-seeking impulse of the poseur, to the democratisation of art and knowledge
in the form of books, pop music, digital networks, self-organised libraries, and the
question of what can be known, and by whom, the urge to disseminate is explored
here as an elemental phenomenon of our time.

Language: English
Pages: 264
Size: 21.5 x 16 cm
Weight: 430 g
Binding: Softcover
ISBN: 9790949004093
€23.00
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The Serving Library Annual 2017/18. Francesca Bertolotti-Bailey, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey, Angie Keefer, Lauren Mackler, David Reinfurt (eds). Roma Publication 305

Posted in art, critique, Motto Berlin store, politics, writing on December 14th, 2017
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The Serving Library Annual comprises a number of individual “Bulletins” organized around a theme for an international audience of designers, artists, writers, and researchers. Newly published by ROMA Publications in a yearly format, this inaugural issue is realised in collaboration with Public Fiction, a journal and exhibition-maker based in Los Angeles. It deals with acts of civil disobedience and other forms of resistance, particularly in view of the relationship between entertainment and power. Contributors include Hilton Als, Tauba Auerbach, Anne Carson, Mark Leckey, Adrian Piper, Frances Stark, and Martine Syms.

Public Fiction’s next project, which runs broadly concurrent to this new Annual’s lifespan, is named The Conscientious Objector — a multifaceted endeavour commissioned by West Hollywood City Council that unfurls in parts from September 2017 to April 2018. Curated by Public Fiction founder Lauren Mackler and Serving Library editor Francesca Bertolotti-Bailey, The Conscientious Objector comprises a series of “commercials” produced by artists for public access TV, an exhibition of artworks and performances at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture’s Schindler House in West Hollywood, and the present publication.

 

€29.50

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In Darkness. A Collaboration by Brothers Kevin & Kristian Henson. Hardworking, Goodlooking. The Office of Culture & Design

Posted in art, critique, graphic design, history, illustration, lifestyle, newsprint, photography, printmaking, writing on December 23rd, 2015
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An Archive of International crust punk music, Filipino anarchist zines, Black and white punk aesthetics, anti-system philosophies, A descent into illness, a discourse on recovery

Published by Hardworking, Goodlooking

€78.00

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The Exhibitionist #11. Jens Hoffman (Ed.). The Exhibitionist

Posted in art, critique, distribution, magazines, writing on October 23rd, 2015
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Overture
Jens Hoffmann, Julian Myers-Szupinska, and Liz Glass
A peculiarity of the current field of curating is an ongoing contestation over the very meaning of “to curate.” As Alice said in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, “The question is whether you can make words mean so many different things.” Humpty Dumpty answers, “The question is which [meaning] is to be master—that’s all.”

On the cover of this issue is Thomas Ruff’s 1989 portrait of a young Hans Ulrich Obrist. If this fresh-faced guy has done more than most to consolidate the identity of the curator—as a ubiquitous, cosmopolitan character, tirelessly promoting him- or herself, an exhibitionist of the global age—he has also presided over that identity’s confusion and multiplication. Is the curator, as Obrist often describes the role, a catalyst? Or is she, to quote Obrist’s frequent collaborator Suzanne Pagé, a modest commis de l’artiste, an “artist’s clerk”?

Curating has become a global concern, yet many languages still even lack a steady term for it. Meanwhile, in some circles, “curation” has a gained a buzzword-ish currency, signaling taste and discrimination across a dizzying array of cultural activities, from so-called “data curation” to creating playlists and dinner menus. The hope, it seems, is that a renewed connoisseurship might discern value amid the profusions of a global market—separate the wheat from the cultural chaff—even if it means, too, that Kanye West now has as much claim on the term “curator” as Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev or Okwui Enwezor. The more we stretch the word, it seems, the easier it becomes to hijack. It is time for some clarity.

In Attitude, João Ribas meditates on this semantic drift of the word “curating” into marketing, where it is proposed as a cure-all for digital excess and consumer glut. Following John Searle, who warns that the terms we use control the field of meaning, Ribas argues that contemporary curators must battle to retain the understanding that “curating” has held historically in the field of art, beyond connoisseurship and mere selection. He emphasizes in particular the spatial and temporal character of exhibitions, which may still offer the possibility of resisting the behavioral paradigms inflicted by capitalist urbanism and digital technology.

Geopolitical space is a central concern for several essays in this issue. In Back in the Day, Clémentine Deliss contends with the Museum of Modern Art’s notorious 1984 exhibition “Primitivism” in 20th Century Art: Affinities of the Tribal and the Modern, which “remains bedeviled by criticisms and emotional refutations that are hard to dissolve.” Comparing that exhibition’s model of “formal affinity” to a recent exhibition by the Senegalese artist and curator El Hadji Sy, she argues for exhibitionary methods that might “effect a remediating affirmation” of ethnographic objects in order to recover something of their “conceptual code.” Missing in Action republishes passages from Rasheed Araeen’s introduction to his 1989 exhibition of British Afro-Asian artists, The Other Story. By assembling the fragments of their collective story, Araeen dismantles the chauvinism of a “master art history” that had excluded non-Western contemporary artists.

In Assessments, Claire Bishop, Cristina Freire, Tobi Maier, and Octavio Zaya address the exhibition Histórias Mestiças (Mestizo Histories), a trenchant critique of Brazil’s racial democracy curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Lilia Moritz Schwarcz at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake in São Paulo. The writers find consonance around one remarkable installation that juxtaposed photographs of indigenous people by Claudia Andujar, 18th-century watercolors of the “discovery” of Brazil by Joaquim José de Miranda, and drawings from the 1970s by Taniki Manippi-theri, a Yanomami shaman. Says Bishop, “Such an anthropological gaze can diminish the present-ism of contemporary art and allow it to become a method or system of thinking. Would that more curators, in more countries, had the nerve to investigate so unflinchingly cherished national myths.” Curators’ Favorites asks contributors to elaborate on an exhibition that has inspired their thinking. Guy Brett describes a 1979 installation by the Brazilian conceptual artist Cildo Meireles, an allegory aimed at the military dictatorship in power at the time. Natasha Ginwala contends with The One Year Drawing Project, an experimental exchange of artworks across Sri Lanka meditating on the traumas of that nation’s civil war. And Vincent Honoré considers the Musée d’art moderne et contemporain in Geneva, claiming the museum itself as a “constant, ever-changing exhibition.”

Six x Six challenges curators to name the exhibitions that have mattered most to them. In this issue, Ionit Behar, Astria Suparak, Inti Guerrero, Gianni Jetzer, Sarah Demeuse, and Nikola Dietrich assemble their miniature pantheons. In Rigorous Research, the scholar Vittoria Martini deliberates the little-discussed 1970 Venice Biennale, a turning point for that venerable institution. In the gap opened by a political stalemate, the staff assumed control, and embraced experimentation and research. Research and reflection also connect the two essays in Rear Mirror. Ruba Katrib details the thinking behind her exhibition Puddle, pothole, portal, co-curated with the artist Camille Henrot at SculptureCenter, New York, describing their attempt to capture something of the weird, rambunctious spatiality of early Disney animations. Scott Rothkopf evinces, in turn, the extraordinary spatial and conceptual deliberation behind his recent Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Across this issue, then, the specificity of curatorial labor emerges—the thought needed to build aggregate meaning from disparate things in space. The word “curating” is not infinitely plastic. This, for us, is what it means. We all know how Humpy Dumpty ended up.

€10.00

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Fillip #20, Kristina Lee Podevsa (Ed.)

Posted in art, critique, magazines, Theory, writing on September 11th, 2015
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In this Issue:

Ken Becker: Not Just Some Canadian Hippie Bullshit: The Western Front as Artists’ Practice
Nathan Crompton: Elegy of the Non-event
Zanna Gilbert: The Human Letter: Mail Art Exchanges between East Berlin and Northeast Brazil in the 1970s
Paul Branca and Jesi Khadivi: Social Networks and Soft Crimes
Lois Klassen: Arriving at Nowhere: Reflecting on Chris Kraus’s Radical Localism
Philip Monk: Battle Stances: General Idea, CEAC, and the Struggle for Ideological Dominance in Toronto, 1976–78
Melanie O’Brian: A Wicked Problem: Fogo Island Dialogues
Nina Power: Decapitalism, Left Scarcity, and the State
Mohammad Salemy, Nick Srnicek, and Alex Williams: Speed Trials: A Conversation about Accelerationist Politics
Chantal Pontbriand and Amy Zion: Parachute: 1975–2007 and Its Afterlife
Yvonne Rainer, Hand Movie

€10.00

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Das prinzip coop. Hannes Meyer und die Idee einer kollektiven Gestaltung. Spector Books.

Posted in architecture, art, books, critique, design, graphic design on September 3rd, 2015
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Edition Bauhaus 48

Text: Claudia Perren, Werner Möller, Astrid Volpert

Genossenschaften, Sharing Community, Co-Housing – das Kollektiv hat Konjunktur. Fragen zum Verhältnis von Gesellschaft und Gestaltung, von individueller und gemeinschaftlicher Kreation und Produktion wurden bereits Ende der 1920er Jahre intensiv am Bauhaus verhandelt: Besonders der zweite Bauhausdirektor Hannes Meyer richtete Lehre und Werkstätten, Planung und Architektur radikal am Kollektiv und seinen Bedürfnissen aus. Revolutionär war besonders Meyers Idee eines gemeinschaftlichen Gestaltungsprozesses. Diesem sogenannten Coop-Prinzip widmet sich nun erstmals eine Ausstellung im Bauhaus Dessau vom 21. Mai bis 4. Oktober 2015.

Co-published mit der Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau

mit 97 schwarz/weiß-Abbildungen, fadengeheftete Broschur

Gestaltung: Prill Vieceli Cremers, Zürich
Herausgeber: Werner Möller in Zusammenarbeit mit/in collaboration with Raquel Franklin

€14.00

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Surpllus: Talk and book launch @ Motto IMA. 01.11.2014.

Posted in architecture, art, books, critique, design, events, graphic design, Motto IMA, Theory on October 29th, 2014
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Surpllus: Talk and book launch @ Motto IMA. 01.11.2014.

IMA and Motto present a talk by Melbourne-based designer and publisher Brad Haylock.

Haylock is program manager of the newly updated Master of Communication Design program at RMIT University, and founding editor of Surpllus, an independent publishing imprint that focuses on critical and speculative practices across art, design, architecture and writing. This talk will consider the politics of publishing and the contested significance of print in the digital age.

Haylock’s talk will be followed by the Brisbane launch of Surpllus #17, Tom Nicholson’s Cartoons for Joseph Selleny, an artist’s book produced as a part of the solo exhibition of the same name at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, and shown in the exhibition Allegory of the Cave Painting at Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerp, both in 2014.

Saturday 1st November, 4pm

Motto IMA
Institute of Modern Art
Ground Floor, Judith Wright Centre
420 Brunswick Street
Fortitude Valley
Brisbane QLD 4006
Australia

 

NOIT – 2: Burning. Lisa Le Feuvre (Ed). Camberwell Press & Flat Time House.

Posted in books, critique, magazines, Theory, Uncategorized, video, writing on July 23rd, 2014

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NOIT – 2: Burning. Lisa Le Feuvre (Ed). Camberwell Press & Flat Time House.

Flat Time House is pleased to announce the publication of the second issue of NOIT, FTHo’s creative journal published in conjunction with Camberwell Press. NOIT–2, guest edited by Lisa Le Feuvre, Head of Sculpture Studies at the Henry Moore Institute, considers how burning, an action predominant in Latham’s ideas, has been deployed by artists in various ways.

In addition, NOIT–2 Burning includes interviews with William Raban on Stephen Cripps, and with Annea Lockwood on her ‘Piano Burnings’; and visual contributions by artists Anthony McCall, Camila Sposati and Marlie Mul. Also included with NOIT is a DVD documenting a series of recent ‘Skoob’ performances undertaken as experiments in relation to the recent exhibition, God is Great (10 -19) – John Latham and Neal White at Portikus in Frankfurt.

Pages: 107
Price: €13,50

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E.R.O.S. #4. Issue launch & presentation @ Motto Berlin. 19.06.2014.

Posted in art, critique, events, Journals, literature, writing on June 17th, 2014
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E.R.O.S. #4. Issue launch & presentation @ Motto Berlin. 19.06.2014.

Please join us to celebrate the Berlin launch of E.R.O.S. #4 at Motto Berlin.

Featuring readings by the editors:

Sami Jalili
Rebecca La Marre
Emma Letitizia Jones

7pm start.

Motto Berlin
Skalitzer Str. 68
im Hinterhof
10097 Berlin